Caffeine Body Mind Distribution

jeffbruce

New member
Jun 9, 2009
1
0
Hey everyone,

Let me start off by saying that I am definitely not a caffeine fiend, but I still have an issue with it. I start off every morning with a large cup of coffee at Tim Horton's with 2 creams and 1 sugar. I have noticed in the past that caffeine can have different effects on me, falling into 2 main categories.

The first one is a mind-dominating effect of caffeine. I notice that maybe 15% of the time I drink caffeine, I get intensely focused and my cognitive skills become exceptional (when compared to my average cognitive skills).

The second category is a body-dominating effect of caffeine, which happens about 85% of the time. Following consumption, all I want to do is mobilize myself. My muscles start flexing as I try to use up all the perceived energy in my system. This is positively, undesired energy. I want the perceived energy to go to my mind, not to my legs and body muscles. I'm already an anxious person as it is, so normally I seek to calm my body down to reduce distraction, otherwise I become intensely focused on my bodily sensations (again, an undesired effect). As a byproduct my cognitive skills decrease.

My question to all of you is:
Does anyone know if there is some science behind this dichotomy I have described here (body vs. mind caffeine effects)? If so, how does one go about manipulating ingestion of caffeine to increase the frequency of the mind-dominating caffeine experiences and reduce the body-dominating caffeine experiences?

What I've noticed is that when I'm really tired, the mind-dominating caffeine experiences are fewer and far between. Caffeine seems to exacerbate the undesired attention I direct toward my body when I'm tired, because I start focusing on my eye muscles, etc. It's all very mysterious to me.

How does caffeine cause muscles to become more active? Is it a mechanical effect (acting on the muscles directly, via the bloodstream) or is it produced by blocking adenosine in muscle-related areas in the brain? I'd be curious to hear all your thoughts.

Cheers
 

cafemakers

New member
Nov 3, 2004
576
0
I have seen no research indicating that caffeine directly impacts any systems other than by blocking the reception of neurotransmitters that tell the brain to sleep. Presumably, the effects that you are experiencing are resulting from the ingestion of sugar or possibly just psychosomatic. You may want to have your blood sugar levels tested as the description of your symptoms sounds vaguely similar to those of hypoglycemia.

You should check out the book "The World of Caffeine." Available at Amazon.com, book stores and your public library: http://tinyurl.com/l2ly5g
 

leancrayon1

New member
Jun 15, 2009
14
0
Greetings jeffbruce,
I'm familiar with those effects that you speak of, and unfortunately, I do not believe that one CAN alter the course of caffeine's effect on the body. As you know, caffeine is a heavy stimulant, it increases the speed and productivity of the brain, and therefore many of the functions that come along with it.

Check out the URL video here: http://current.com/items/76310262_a-bra ... feine.html

This is a rather crude but efficient study on the physical effect that caffeine has on the human brain. I probably don't have to tell you that it speeds up the heart rate and what not, but as the video shows, caffeine increases the amount of blood flowing to particular parts of the brain, not simply "the brain".

Since different areas of the brain are transmitting signals that determine different body functions, those most heavily affected by the caffeine (those with highest blood flow=highest activity) are going to be noticeable. Several such areas are the medula oblongata, the parietal lobe, and the temporal lobes. The Medula controls simple motor neurons to vital body functions; heart and respiration rate for instance. The parietal lobe is responsible for functions with movement and orientation, its increased activity results in your observed movement and jerkiness. Finally, the temporal lobes. These control speech and recognition, and the impairment (or stimulation, depending on how you look at it) of these lobes is what leads to slurred speech and sometimes higher cognitive capabilities, because your brain is processing and recognizing perceptions at an increased rate than normal.

In essence, my answer to you is that caffeine causes increased muscle activity because of brain stimulation, and the specific areas affected explain the various effects that caffeine reportedly has.
Hope this was mildly amusing for a time, thank you.
-Lean

Works Cited:
http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/kinser/Structure1.html
http://www.twu.edu/dsc/labeled_diagram_human_brain.jpg
http://current.com/items/76310262_a-bra ... feine.html
 

leancrayon1

New member
Jun 15, 2009
14
0
Excellent, glad to hear it. I just like to apply high standards of writing and pay respect to those who supply me with my information. To the future flow of well composed information; cheers!
-Lean
 

CoffeeMakerStore

New member
Sep 15, 2009
8
0
I don't know of any specific science either, but I'm actually the opposite. It seems like no matter how much coffee (or caffeine) I consume, I never experience any of the effects to my nervous system. I think I once used some "No doze" in college and I remember it actually keeping me awake, but other than that I've never experienced any of these effects.

The advanced cognitive skills would be cool though.
 

krishpaskel

New member
Dec 23, 2011
14
0
I don't apperceive of any specific science either, but I'm in fact the opposite. It seems like no amount how abundant coffee (or caffeine) I consume, I never acquaintance any of the furnishings to my afraid system.
 
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