coffee shop uniforms?

co2beans

New member
Mar 19, 2005
5
0
san antonio texas
what uniforms should my employees wear? yes i realize aprons are must but what type of shirt? you know collar or no collar t-shirt or dress shirt.how about if i'm in a wealthy area does it really matter?
 

Cappy Ccino

New member
Mar 15, 2005
9
0
Marysville, WA
It's important to portray some kind of image to the public. Hopefully, it's your business image they'll be seeing. I think it's very important for uniformity in any restaurant, deli or espresso bar. It portrays a much more professional image, and you don't have to worry about inappropriate clothing being worn, or wasted advertising for Abacrombie, for instance!
Espresso bars we've worked with, simply choose a style of shirt, and get their logo printed on the front, supplying their baristas with 3 or 4. They pick up a few to sell to customers as well. It's also a good way to promote a new drink, put it on the shirt! Variety is always nice.
 

NordstromCoffee

New member
Jan 22, 2005
57
0
We found that we needed a material that does not wrinkle so our uniforms are made of a jersey material. We have a lot of young people who tend to leave their uniform in a ball on their floor when they get home. It may be something for you to consider. As for pants it is better in my opinion to just chose a color that they need to wear instead of obtaining the same cut pants since there are so many body types they usually will end up looking odd on most of the employees. Hope that helps.
 

Twitch

New member
Mar 9, 2005
28
0
Sacramento, CA
I'm in the process of starting a drive through and the only major consideration I'm giving so far is to have T-shirts or something similar that the people will wear. Nice pants or clean, no hole, non-funky-faded jeans will be allowed. (most customers will only see baristas and servers from the waste up)

I'm going with T-shirts because there is a local hut where the girls dress somewhat provocatively, and for me, that just won't do.
 

Rockcreekcoffee

New member
Dec 8, 2004
39
0
Billings, MT
Uniforms

Uniforms depend on the image you want to portrait. We have a very rustic feel in our coffee house. Even though we are downtown and in a business district I allow my employees to wear the following:

Company T-Shirt
Jeans or Khaki's (summer: shorts at or right above the knee).

If they don't have a clean company t-shirt, they can wear a white shirt with an apron. Very few young baristas have a washer & dryers at home, so give them another option if their company supplied t-shirt is dirty.

Rock Creek Coffee Roasters
 

t3hjoon

New member
Mar 6, 2005
17
0
NordstromCoffee said:
We found that we needed a material that does not wrinkle so our uniforms are made of a jersey material. We have a lot of young people who tend to leave their uniform in a ball on their floor when they get home. It may be something for you to consider. As for pants it is better in my opinion to just chose a color that they need to wear instead of obtaining the same cut pants since there are so many body types they usually will end up looking odd on most of the employees. Hope that helps.


surprisingly ive found a way to wrinkle that wrinkle free jersey! and i didnt even curl it into a ball. but i think we should wear black non jersey button ups ^^
 

Tam

New member
Mar 17, 2005
9
0
Minnesota
co2beans said:
what uniforms should my employees wear? yes i realize aprons are must but what type of shirt? you know collar or no collar t-shirt or dress shirt.how about if i'm in a wealthy area does it really matter?

One local place has t-shirts with store logo. The one down the street does, too, but the shirts look lousy (colors faded and fabric pilled). They must have used cheaper shirts. Another one in town uses black aprons and baseball caps. Looks great. Whatever you do, consider the size, age and sex of your employees and choose quality fabric. I would also make sure from the very beginning that you, as boss, have the right to veto any outfits. Tackiness doesn't sell.

Tam
 

crosswinds

New member
May 11, 2005
15
0
dayton Ohio
We are going with White PLAIN t shirts and navy or black pants. Plus we have aprons with the logo sewn into them. That makes it easy for everyone.
 

Coffee Guy

New member
Oct 19, 2003
874
0
Seattle,Washington USA
Uniforms really depend on the type of operation you run and the budget you have. I agree with most of the points that Cappy Ccino makes, however, 3-4 shirts per employee can get pretty spendy, especially if you have high turn over at your location. I can see providing the first shirt for free, but the employee should pay for the second and so on. Next, have an employee meeting to discuss what everyone feels comfortable wearing. Give them a say so and you will have little resistance when it comes time for them to wear them. Let the employees share their input on everything from the style to the fabric. Have fun with the uniforms, if you have an established logo, then make sure it's noticed, and maybe have the barista's name embroidered on the shirt as well. Customers love to see the names of the people serving their drinks.

When you make things fun, everyone has fun. This will also end the problem with some that like to wear next to nothing. Besides the employees know who the boss is, and they are less likely to try to push things over the edge. Just my two cents... :wink:
 

mikefly

New member
Jul 22, 2005
35
0
please no more polos if i see another place using polos i might have to climb to the top of a bell tower...im going to stop there incase big brother is watching...wait i watch big brother ohh well im going for coffee ill fly if you buy
 

FireCracker

New member
Jul 25, 2005
10
0
Iowa, USA
We use black polo's (sorry mikefly. I'm one of mikefly's partners by the way, he lost the polo vote ;)), and kahki pants. We wanted to stay away from using white shirts because it will show every coffee stain. Our chef wears a black chef coat with kahkis. We are a newer shop, and so far no one else has complained about our uniforms.

I think that it is very important to pick something that matches your shop, and your customer base. If you are a ritzier shop, with high end clients, then it would be okay to put your baristas in white shirts and bow ties; however if you are an average coffee house serving the middle class community then even t-shirts and jeans would be okay.
 
Un-Form

OK on the apron. We're debating dress codes ... a tough issue for a closet hippie to even think about.

I'd really like to go aprons, ball caps with a "dress casual at work" code for the remaining. NO advertising or logowear (except maybe my godson's band, Palliard, they're really good.) Oh, darn those exceptions keep creeping into life.

Oh, and no open-toed shoes -- safety issue.

What else?

Jack
 

topher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2003
3,724
10
Boca Raton
I think aprons are great...I hate when I go in to a shop and the barista is sloppy looking from spilled drinks on his/her shirt!! I also like name badges....do not like ball caps. They wore them at the casino when I started...but kids today like to wear them so low that you can not see their eyes..I hate when I can't look someone in the eyes!
 

espresso2rm

New member
Jul 13, 2005
20
0
Pastry margins??

I was curious on the standard markup for scones, muffins, etc. Well heck all pastries in general. I'm trying to stay close to what other competitors are doing but it seems like slim if no money at all in some instances.
It sometimes seems as if pastries and desserts are just there for decoration more than any real profit?

Can someone shed some light here for me as this is burning some serious mental chi for me.... and I don't have much left to just throw away.

Please please please help!
 
Pasteries

Here's the way we're looking at the extras:

1. What does the customer expect?
2. How can we exceed expectations?
3. Is that reasonably profitable?
4. If "yes" proceed?
5. If "no" ask this question: On balance does it support higher revenues in other lines?

The gist of this is: If having break even pasteries helps you generate 10% or 20% more espresso sales that are highly profitable then likely pasteries are good for your business.

The intangible is customer expectation. You may not sell a pasterie to a customer but does that customer expect to see pasteries in a coffee shop? Might that expectation prompt a return visit? Might the lack dissuade a return visit.

Grocery stores don't make much margin, if any, on milk. Would you frequent a grocery story that didn't carry milk?

I mumble a lot like this to myself ... awake ... asleep ...
 
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