Combo grinder/brewers - Any good ones?

Emoto

New member
May 29, 2009
2
0
Hi,

Some friends are considering getting one of those coffee machines that grinds and then brews. Not an espresso machine. They have 3 toddlers, so time is tight for them. They do appreciate a good cup of coffee, and the husband has had good espresso at my house, but I think they probably want something more mainstream. Any suggestions as to what they should look at? I know the Technivorm machines are excellent, but I don't think they also grind...

Thanks!

Bob
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,588
2
Central North Carolina
Same advice I gave on CoffeeGeek... the grind-n-brew machines aren't all they cracked up to be. Humidity and heat will wreak havoc on any beans and remaining grounds in the unit. Later!
 
I am firmly of the opinion that a grinder built into any machine- be it an espresso machine or a machine-cup device, generally will not result in better quality coffee than a seperate machine and grinder setup. Good grinders are costly for a reason. Good machines are costly for a reason. Buyer beware any deal where a grinder/machine combined into one is cheaper than the seperate entities.
 

PinkRose

Super Moderator
Staff member
Feb 28, 2008
5,219
5
Near Philadelphia, PA
Hello "Emoto"

Although I certainly agree that a separate grinder and coffee brewer are the best way to go, I have to admit that I'm very satisfied with my Cuisinart Grind and Brew coffee maker (Cuisinart-DGB-600BC)that I have at home.

I don't have the newer model that has the compartment on top where you keep the beans....I wouldn't get one of those because I'm sure that the heat and humidity would destroy the beans if left in the container.

I have a Cuisinart-DGB-600BC (BC stands for black chrome) with the thermal carafe, and I've been very happy with it.

There are a few factors to consider, though. Most coffee grinders make noise, and the grinder on this coffee maker is no exception. Some people think it is very noisy, (for about 10-15 seconds) which may be a factor to consider especially if your friend has toddlers in the house.

The grinder parts, along with the brew basket, etc. must be washed and dried before using the coffee maker again. I have no problem with that, because I'm so used to the daily clean-up chores in the cafe where I work. So, for me, rinsing out a few coffee maker parts at home is no big deal.

However, the coffeemaker makes a really good cup of coffee, especially when you use fresh beans. It would be a good choice for someone who doesn't have a lot of time to play with an espresso machine, or take the time to use a separate grinder and coffee maker

I have had no problems with my coffee maker, and I've had it for about 3 years. I've had friends remark that it's the best coffee that they've had in a long time (I mainly use Papua New Guinea beans now-a-days). It works for me!

http://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-DGB-600 ... 785&sr=8-6

Another option would be to get a separate burr grinder and learn how to use a French Press. I also make my coffee that way... when I have the time.

I hope this helps.

Rose
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,588
2
Central North Carolina
Great post/review PinkRose.....

Those things might be OK for the average coffee drinker. I'd like to know exactly what type of grinder they utilize. The newest Cuisinart units (the 700 and 900) appear to have a decent burr grinder, but the rest that I've seen have a chopper, not a true grinder. Now I do know the better Capresso models have their Infinity conical burrset implemented into their machines and that is leaps and bounds over what most companies offer.

This also brings me to another point about home drip machines. With the exception of the Technivorm and the higher end Capresso brewers, I highly doubt any other brands actually brew at a decent/consistent temperature. My wife and I are running a mobile espresso van business (going quite well I might add) and we have a Bunn VPR drip brewer in the van along with the matching Bunn LPG grinder. I can honestly say this machine cranks out the very best drip coffee I've ever tasted. Proper showerhead design and performance along with proper/consistent brew temps. brings out more flavor than you could imagine. ALL brands of home machines I've drank from over the years are nowhere close. Of course this setup is a bit large and expensive for home use, but having these performance factors are way more important than something that is quick, easy, looks good, etc. Later!
 

PinkRose

Super Moderator
Staff member
Feb 28, 2008
5,219
5
Near Philadelphia, PA
Hello Shadow745!

I'm very happy to hear that your new mobile espresso van business is going well!

To answer your question, unfortunately the Cuisinart Grind and Brew coffee maker (Cuisinart-DGB-600BC) that I have at home, has a whirley-bird blade grinder. It seems to grind (chop) the beans to a medium course grind of obviously inconsistent sized particles, but all in all, the coffee seems to turn out well. I was considering getting one of the newer models that have the burr grinder, but I was disappointed to see that they have the bean hopper on top, which I imagine would expose the coffee beans to heat and humidity.

I think the Cuisinart-DGB-600BC is a good home machine, especially for someone who's on a budget. I received mine as a gift several years ago. I was reluctant to give it a try, but I was pleasantly surprised at the result.

I pre-heat the thermal carafe with hot water before brewing the coffee, and the machine seems to heat the water sufficiently and consistently. It takes about 11 minutes to grind, heat 48 ounces of water and brew the coffee. (and it's around 9 minutes for 36 ounces).

For the time being, I'm happy to be able to enjoy a couple of decent cups of coffee (without too much effort) at home before I dash off to work.

Rose
 
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