Convert an Espresso Machine to 110V

Stalbro

New member
Mar 4, 2009
1
0
Hi,

I wounder if anyone know if it is difficult to convert an espresso machine from 220v to 110v?

Me and my wife have recently moved home from Europe, my grandmother gave us an espresso Machine that we really like, (Francis Francis X1) and since we got it in Europe it uses 220v. We really want to keep it since it was an wedding present. They are sold here as well, so there has got to be a way to change something on the inside, I'm no electrician.

So does anyone have some electrical skills and might be able to help me with this I would really appreciate it!

Thanks
Johan
 

CCafe

New member
Aug 11, 2004
1,557
0
Des Moines, Iowa
Honestly it would be cheaper for you to pull 12 gauge wire and add a 20 amp receptacle along with a 20 amp 240 volt breaker then it would be to convert your machine over. Also upon conversion you would most likely be less happy with the results as most 110 volt appliances tend to have a lot smaller elements and a much longer recovery time. Problem with 110v is the amperage starts adding up quickly when you have higher wattage devices. That is why you don't normally see more then 1500 watts elements in 110v devices. You can run a 4000 watt device on a 20 amp 240 circuit and only use about 16.5 amps.

My suggestion is simply leave it alone and add another circuit.
 

dolores

New member
Mar 10, 2015
2
0
I have the opposite problem, leaving the US to live in South America with 220v. So tell me if you see the answer
Thanks Dolores
 

CCafe

New member
Aug 11, 2004
1,557
0
Des Moines, Iowa
Step down transformers will work if the output amperage at 120V is high enough. The other thing I would look into is what the Hertz rating is. Some things don't like switching between 50/60 Hertz so make sure whatever you take can handle both.
 

Nucer

New member
Aug 6, 2014
29
0
Benbrook, Texas
I lived in China for many months and it is 220V there also. A converter will work just need to look at the amperage on the converter. Be careful I did burn out a few device (yes even engineers get stupid) and had to replace a few. My electric tooth brush was one thing I let the magic smoke out of and had to buy another so....

You can also convert from 120 to 220V so look into a converter but again look at amperage. The hertz is no all that important. On lot of devices with chargers they are made for different currents. That is the reason I didn't burn out my computer or shaver. :)
 

wwcove

Banned
Jun 20, 2014
189
0
It's best to look at the total wattage of unit and multiply by 3 or 4 times to handle the surge when turned on and when heat is turned on. So if you have a 500 watt device get a 2000 watt voltage counter.

as far as Hz if yours is 50/60 your covered. If not you can get a converter for this. Generally running a 50Hz unit in North Ameica at 60 will not hurt unit. It will run fast and will get hotter. But running a 60 down to 50hz in foreign countries may burn up unit very quickly...
 

wwcove

Banned
Jun 20, 2014
189
0
It all depends on the wattage of unit- it is always best to try to use a converter that is rated 3 times more wattage that the 220 unit. For example: if units wattage is 500 get a 1500 or 2000 watt converter and so forth. That's not always possible. But I would at least try to get double. I use converters all the time for gas coffee roasters that have wattage up to 1000 or more. I use a 3000 watt converter for those. There comes a point where the converter costs more that a dedicated 220v outlet. At that point the outlet could make more sense.
 
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