Home Espresso Equipment Question

MRSRoasting

New member
Mar 9, 2006
11
0
South Carolina
Been a long time since I've posted. I have been home roasting for a little while and want to start pulling espresso shots at home. I have the option to buy a Nuova Simonelli Mac2000V 1 Group for $650 or a smaller "cheap" residential type machine. Some of the other machines I'm looking at are the Krups Home Pump machines, DeLonghi Pump, etc. for $60-300. What suggestions can you make about any of this? I'm a little concerned that the Mac although a great machine may be overkill. Thanks!
 
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MRSRoasting

New member
Mar 9, 2006
11
0
South Carolina
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Home Espresso

Ok, what do you think guys/gals? Start cheap and work my way up or go commercial with the "Big" machine for home use?
 

mrgnomer

New member
Jan 22, 2006
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Canada
MRSRoasting said:
Been a long time since I've posted. I have been home roasting for a little while and want to start pulling espresso shots at home. I have the option to buy a Nuova Simonelli Mac2000V 1 Group for $650 or a smaller "cheap" residential type machine. Some of the other machines I'm looking at are the Krups Home Pump machines, DeLonghi Pump, etc. for $60-300. What suggestions can you make about any of this? I'm a little concerned that the Mac although a great machine may be overkill. Thanks!

A Mac2000V for $650? I just googled the machine and they retail for about $3500...

It's really hard to say what you should go with to start off since it depends on you. Have you tasted real, very good espresso before? If you have, going to a cheap pump machine will frustrate you, I think, since even if you get good as an operator you won't consistently get good espresso from a cheap machine.

I went with a 'cheap' set up, a Rancilio Silvia espresso machine and a Rancilio Rocky grinder. In the world of true espresso, this is what I found to be a reliable entry level set up. After a few months of developing the understanding and skill to make good espresso I found how limiting even this capable set up is. You get to a certain level with your espresso and want more but it's really hard to push the bar up with a set up that struggles to deliver for you.

After wondering should I spend the money or shouldn't I with an upgrade I went for an upgrade of both grinder and machine. It was the best move I could have ever made. I have a real machine now and a very capable grinder and my espresso has leaped forward in terms of quality and consistency.

So, again, it depends on you. What are you after and how much time and effort are you willing to put into good espresso? You'll need a good grinder, with the Nuova I'd advise atleast a Mazzer Mini, Macap M4 or any other $400+ commercial grade grinders. The Mac 2000 specs are great and it's seriously capable machine. You will need a good grind. A good grind and fresh roasted beans, not store bought, been in transit and sat on the shelf for who knows how long beans.

As well, at the price that your machine is being offered I'd wonder if it had some commercial use and is need of an overhaul. That's really less than what a new machine goes for retail so if you don't know the machine's condition or who you're buying it from expect to spend some time and money getting the machine going. It's still better than going with a cheap pump machine and you'll probably save a some money over a new machine and learn something about espresso machines, maintainance and repair in the process.

Go with a cheap machine and you'll be hobbled and very limited in making good espresso if it's even possible. Steaming could and probably will be even poorer on a cheap machine. Had I known when I started what I know now about espresso I would have put my money on the set up I've upgraded to but that's 20/20 hindsight and I didn't know anything when I started- just took a chance. Using limiting equipment forced me to aquire good barista skills so I'd have to say it was worth it but using equipment that's not capable no matter how good you get as a barista is a waste, IMHO. There's more to espresso than a pump pressure of 15bar, which is way too high anyway. 8-9 bar is the ideal range for normal to slightly restricted extractions, BTW.

Good luck.
 

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