Home Roaster

That's good coffee

New member
Apr 19, 2005
2
0
Connecticut
Hi All:

I'm looking for a home roaster, something that can do a pound, nothing to big or to expensive, it don't want to spend more then $200.00. I'm sick of buying coffee at the store and running out right before the weekend, just like now. :( I would like to roast my own coffee in my home and supply my parents with some also. :)

Thanks,

Theresa
 

ElPugDiablo

New member
Jul 16, 2004
991
0
Hartford and New Haven, CT
Go to www.sweetmarias.com or similar sites for all your home roasting need. Unfortunately, I don't think there is a home roaster that will do one pound at a time. Even the largest home roaster, HotTop, at about $600.00, will not roast one pound at a time. When you get to one pound range, you are looking at a very small shop roaster like this one, http://www.diedrichroasters.com/sample.html, that costs alot more than $200.00

Lastly, after roasting you should let the beans rest for 24 to 48 hours, so you can't just roast some when you are out; need to plan ahead :D .

Good luck.
 

ourcoffeebarn

New member
Nov 8, 2004
174
0
Wisconsin
There is no law written that you need to let your beans rest! Go ahead and grind some up if you want to! What does a roaster do with his sample roasts? he cups them the same day he roasts them. What does a roaster do when he wants to test quality before shipping a freshly roasted batch of coffee? Does he let it rest for 48 hours before he cups it? no. I think you get my point, it is strictly my point of view , and by the way I own, run and roast the coffee for a web based coffee roasting company!

If you want a roaster that you can roast up to 3 lbs of coffee at a time and you own a Gas BBQ grill with a rotissurie check out RK Drums http://rkdrums.com/ Even if you have to buy a grill you can get set up for under 500.00 if you buy smart! And you will have the ability to roast 1 lb or more of coffee at a time.
 

ElPugDiablo

New member
Jul 16, 2004
991
0
Hartford and New Haven, CT
ourcoffeebarn said:
There is no law written that you need to let your beans rest! Go ahead and grind some up if you want to! What does a roaster do with his sample roasts? he cups them the same day he roasts them. What does a roaster do when he wants to test quality before shipping a freshly roasted batch of coffee? Does he let it rest for 48 hours before he cups it? no. I think you get my point, it is strictly my point of view , and by the way I own, run and roast the coffee for a web based coffee roasting company!

There too is no law written that you need to lay down your first growth Bordeaux for 10 or more years, you can drink it the year they are released, but that is not exactly smart. That is not just my point of view, that is the way it is. I am glad you own and run a coffee roasting company, that makes two of us :lol: :D
 

topher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2003
3,724
11
Boca Raton
Im with ElPugDiablo....I too am a roaster for a web based company :wink: Coffee needs to de-gas!!
 

ourcoffeebarn

New member
Nov 8, 2004
174
0
Wisconsin
Thats why I use a degassing valve in my bags! Give this HOME ROASTER a chance to decide for himself, a pot of fresh roasted coffee doesn't hurt anyone!
 

topher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2003
3,724
11
Boca Raton
Never told the home roaster to not drink the coffee when it is grassy...just suggested they wait 24 hours. I use the valves also :grin: You have to or your bag will pop :wink: So home roaster...do us a favor...taste the coffee right after you roast it...then drink the same coffee 24 hours later...do tell what you find.
 

ElPugDiablo

New member
Jul 16, 2004
991
0
Hartford and New Haven, CT
Theresa still needs a roaster. So...an alternative to RK Drums 3 pounder, for less than $100.00 you can buy a roasting kit on eBay and convert your Ronco/George Foreman Rotisserie into a 1 pounder :D :D

http://cgi.ebay.com/COFFEE-ROASTER-Geor ... dZViewItem


disclaimer: I know nothing about this company or about this product, I don't have any dealing with this company, and any purchase from anyone does not benefit me or my company what so ever; I just surf the web too much, and hope someone fine this information helpful. Make sure you ask them plenty of questions, especially about smoke and ventilation, cleaning and maintenance, safety and roaster fire.
 

ourcoffeebarn

New member
Nov 8, 2004
174
0
Wisconsin
Thank You for letting the Home Roaster try it their way! I'm not saying it tastes the same, nor does it smell the same after grinding extremely fresh roasted coffee as rested coffee. All that I want to get through to the home roasters out there is HAVE FUN! Roasting coffee is a great hobby! It also tastes great too!
 

ElPugDiablo

New member
Jul 16, 2004
991
0
Hartford and New Haven, CT
using just roasted coffee

OK, here's what happened. Last week, we were low on beans so I was forced to used some beans that were rested less than 2 days. When brewed at full batch, they spilled all over the place. What I learned was that fresh roasted not sufficiently de-gas beans are releasling gas very quickly while being brewed, and the gas actually is resisting the water coming out of brewer, creating a pressure system, forcing grounds out of the top, and creating a big mess. So, for a couple of days, we brewed only 1/2 batch even during peak hours, like that's a lot of fun. So, I stand by my statement, rest your beans, they taste better, and they don't create a mess.
 

Dark Majestic

New member
May 4, 2006
12
0
Well I just had some India monsooned malabar just out of my roaster's roaster ... about 5 to 6 hours aging time ... VERY GOOD ... his advice is to let the beans cool then grind away... no need to age.

So far I can't disagree.

Good Day ....
 

SHalland

New member
Feb 17, 2006
8
0
Montana
If you want a roaster that you can roast up to 3 lbs of coffee at a time and you own a Gas BBQ grill with a rotissurie check out RK Drums http://rkdrums.com/ Even if you have to buy a grill you can get set up for under 500.00 if you buy smart! And you will have the ability to roast 1 lb or more of coffee at a time.


I used one of those for several years, before we bought our comercial roaster, just for home use, and it worked great. It was a really nice way to learn just how coffee goes through the whole roasting process on a small scale and it made a great cup.
 

zdketch

New member
Sep 2, 2006
1
0
topher said:
Never told the home roaster to not drink the coffee when it is grassy...just suggested they wait 24 hours. I use the valves also :grin: You have to or your bag will pop :wink: So home roaster...do us a favor...taste the coffee right after you roast it...then drink the same coffee 24 hours later...do tell what you find.

I use a zach & Dani's roaster. I love all the flavors I'm finding. But sometimes it tastes grassy! Like you say!
Is that because I roast and grind it the same day? :shock:
 

Jackson

New member
Aug 22, 2006
108
0
Columbus, OH
Grassy taste

Coffee could taste grassy for several reasons. The number one reason in my opinion would be the quality of the green. If the beans are old, the coffee would not taste too good. If the beans were processed using the dry method, and they were not dried correctly, it would change the flavor of the coffee. If it was a poor grade of coffee (too many defects), it might taste grassy.

If you know the quality of the green coffee was better than just described, it could be the roast. Some coffees will taste grassy if not roasted to at least an American roast. Check your roaster and make sure it is roasting evenly. If not all the beans take the roast, pick through the batch and throw away any quakers or lighter beans. Also, make sure the batch is not flash roasted. Make sure the roaster is operating correctly.

If none of the above applies, sit back and bite your nails for two days till the coffee rests.
 

Timbo

New member
Aug 5, 2006
3
0
Had to chime in on ElPugDiablo's reference to the Foreman Rotisserie roaster. Bought one about 3 years ago. It was a giant, flaming, seething piece of crap. It made the worst beans I have ever come across. The only words I can think of to adequately describe the roaster and what it produced aren't appropriate to this forum.

Where to begin? It was difficult to impossible to unload beans after roasting. The roast chamber was too hot and cumbersome to handle. Forget about ever cleaning out the roast chamber. It couldn't maintain a constant temperature. It had to be used outdoors because it smoked too much. The roaster itself became dangerously hot after two batches. Once the roaster got heated up it was almost impossible not to burn the beans. Loading green beans through the roast chamber door, which was really just a slit in the drum, was difficult at best. When the roaster was hot, it was almost impossible to do without burning yourself.

As for the beans, they emerged scorched, dried out, and bereft of flavor. The best way I can describe the outcome is Waffle House coffee, made using Folgers, and sitting on the burner for 6 hours. I probably put 50 lbs of green through the roaster and might have produced one acceptable batch. Hands down the worst coffee I've ever sampled.
 
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