looking for packages

gimme_coffee

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May 6, 2005
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Indiana
I'm not sure if this is the right forum for this and if it isn't, please move it.

I have looked at a couple of different programs where, for a price, equipment and supplies and training is provided

One I found is http://www.eurocafeimports.com/crate.html

I am wondering if anyone else has gone this route but with a different company? I'd like some more to compare it too

Thanks in advance for your help! :D
 
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gimme_coffee

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May 6, 2005
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Indiana
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that's why I was looking for a comparable company and eurocafeimports is based in New York. well that's where the catalog was addressed from at any rate.
 

LiftOff

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Nov 3, 2004
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Arizona
It's not difficult to find good equipment and supplies, it's all out there and with a little research on your part you can make informed purchases. The hard part is finding a good roaster and developing a relationship. Most roasters, including me will provide some training.
Remember, you can have the best equipment and a highly trained, motivated staff but if you use crap coffee...

Lesson #1 provided free of charge by ROCKET COFFEE
 
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gimme_coffee

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I know we have one really good local roaster and not sure if there are others.

I'm clueless on the business end of things as a coffee business goes. What is the going wholesale rate for a pound of beans? or how is that figured? I appreciate any help anyone can and is willing to give me.
 

LiftOff

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Nov 3, 2004
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Arizona
You have an awful lot to learn if you really want to be a success in this biz. I would first go see your local roaster and ask for his/her help and start reading, and read some more...you get the picture.

Or you can throw $20,000 at the first startup package you like and end up with nice machinery, bad coffee and still no idea what you are doing.
 
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gimme_coffee

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LiftOff said:
You have an awful lot to learn if you really want to be a success in this biz.

well that's what I'm trying to do is learn and I thought this would be a good place to do that.

maybe I was wrong....
 
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gimme_coffee

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so beyond going to my local roaster cuz I'd like to be armed with more knowledge than what I know before I go to him, is there any other suggestions you might have for obtaining the info I obviously need?
 

celement

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Apr 17, 2005
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Modesto, CA
My Coffee and Espresso is out of State

Gimme...I did not read in detail what they give you for $20k. Might be a good package, might be too much, but there is plenty of ways to dig on the pricing on the Internet.

As to where your espresso and coffee come from I would not be concerned. I'm in California and both my espresso and coffee come from Seatle. If anyone thinks thats bad my coffee maker sells theirs to lead hotels in Vegas, NY, and plenty of top quality coffee houses in California. Yes I could save by roasting my own, but I've gotten rave reviews on what I buy and am glad I did.

The man who represents this coffee supplier for me is great. He offered me a great deal of training, access to equipment suppliers \ maintenance people, and more. I check on many of these issues online before spending any money, and the results were the guy steered me in great directions.
 

ElPugDiablo

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Jul 16, 2004
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Hartford and New Haven, CT
If you are looking for source for beans, the only way to do this is by tasting what are out there. Ideally, you want to get your beans as fresh as possible, and there are many good roasters that roast to order. If you need names, go to http://www.coffeereview.com/ , there are names of many roasters for you to contact. Please keep in mind taste is a very subjective thing, so don't shop by their rating, shop by tasting and what you think is best for your market.

If you are worry about training, and store layout, you should work for a few good coffeehouses. Since you have little coffee business experience, I strongly recommend you work for someone else for at least a year. You should also go to coffee trade shows such as SCAA convention, and CoffeeFest.

If you are looking for equipment, while Conti is a reputable brand (although I was told to stay away from Twin Stars), there are others out there. Once you have a roaster in mind, you need to try different machines and decide which is best for you and your beans.

As far as wholesale price, it depends. You can get one quote, and there will always be someone who will come in 25 cents cheaper. Since coffee is the reason of your shop's existence, buy by quality, not by price. You are better off paying a dollar more per pound and charging 25 cents more per shot than paying a dollar less per pound and charging 25 censt less than Starbucks.
 
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