Need help gaining experience

RMC

New member
Jun 21, 2007
11
0
Medford, OR
Hi,
I'm living in Medford, OR and intent on opening a drive-thru in my home town on the east coast. I need practical working experience, but frankly cannot afford to pay for a training course. I am looking for anyone in the area that I can visit with and, if not participate, at least observe the process of serving customers. This is probably asking a lot, especially from people whom I have never met. If this is something you would even consider, please contact me. Perhaps there is an arrangement we can reach whereby you can benefit from helping me. Either way, thanks for taking the time to read my request and have a wonderful day.
 

cafemakers

New member
Nov 3, 2004
576
0
I'm living in Medford, OR and intent on opening a drive-thru in my home town on the east coast. I need practical working experience, but frankly cannot afford to pay for a training course.

Professional training is a small investment (and yet, an important one) in the budget for any new business launch. If you are unable to afford even this basic necessity, how can you reasonably expect to afford the many expenses related to business launch and have additional capital to support operations during the first several months while building a customer base?

The Small Business Administration estimates that 50% of all new businesses will fail in the first five years; the two primary reasons: management inexperience and undercapitalization. Entering into a business venture that is undercapitalized greatly increases the chances that business will fail.

You may wish to consider seeking outside funding from a bank loan or private investor -- if cash is still tight, you may be better off shelving the idea until financial conditions improve.

Best of success,

Andrew
 
OP
R

RMC

New member
Jun 21, 2007
11
0
Medford, OR
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
Gaining experience

Let me rephrase,
I am certain to open a shop. I must fly back east periodically to check on locations and meet with my banker, possibly have to pay for information to suppliment my business plan, keep 20% in the bank to cover my portion of the initial investment, keep another account with at least my first quarter's assumed operating expenses. Pay my graphic designer for a professional workup of my logo...the list seems endless. Perhaps "cannot afford" was the wrong choice of words. Maybe I should simply have said that at this point, if I can save 1 red cent I'm going to try! I would gladly share what little I know with anyone if I thought I could help them. Why spend more money than is necessary when there may be people willing to share their real-world experience without any agenda? Every local company I have spoken with that offers training services also wants to sell me countless other things. Besides, I identify with small business owners more than salesmen. Still, I appreciate your concern that it may appear that I am putting myself in financial jeopardy. And, if you think professional training would be more informative, comprehensive, or useful in the long run than I will gladly go that route. Let me know.
 

cafemakers

New member
Nov 3, 2004
576
0
Whew! Relieved to hear it. After reading your message, I thought to my self "oh no, there goes another one; I had better say something."

You've hit on the challenge of locating a benevolent 'apprenticeship' in the business. Retail business owners expect to recover the expense of training employees, normally through the benefits that their employment brings the business -- or, in case that trainee intends to leave soon thereafter and start a new business, by developing some kind of commercial relationship with the prospect (selling him stuff). There's not much motivation to spend the time and resources on training some outside party for free when you've got a business to run.

Unfortunately, businesses I've seen that are willing to train those whose primary motivation is not for employment (sometimes just to have another body behind the bar for a couple of weeks) are probably not the role models that you want to emulate.

While you move toward the launch of your business, continue to immerse yourself in the culture of the industry. There is probably not much benefit to attending a formal training class at this stage anyway; reserve your funds to attend informal 'barista jams,' local coffee tastings, industry conferences and competitions -- this will give you a flavor for what must be eventually accomplished and lay a foundation of experience from which you will benefit. Pick up a little piece of information from every source. After you have staffed the site and as prepare to launch the business is the best time to receive professional instruction for the entire team.

I've seen a number of people go off to some training center 6 months or a year ahead of a planned opening, only to forget the detail and nuance of the professional instruction that they have received when they are ready to apply that information. Even if well-timed, it is unreasonable to expect that one person can be introduced to a completely foreign concept and then effectively educate others with only 5 day's classroom training -- your experience from the many sources above will improve your ability to integrate the information learned in a formal training class and make you a better instructor for your staff.

Education is not a one-time vaccination; you can't be inoculated by watching a videotape, attending a class or even holding a single lecture for your first wave of employees. You can absorb valuable information from a variety of sources (including this very site). When you approach business with the mindset that training is a core part of your business culture, you'll find that there are opportunities to learn more and improve each day.
 

NW JAVA

New member
HI and congratulations on your project/dream. I started from NOTHING except some dough and a desire. Yeah I'im my fifth year and looking forward. Learn all you can, goto http://www.baristaguildofamerica.org/ and post the same request. If you were in my area. Skagit County WA. / Mount Vernon is the town. Id be happy to tell/show you all about my coffee experience and tha value of not wasting money and saving/making money while taking pride in serving the best coffee peeps have tasted. NO FEE
 

RowanTuckfield

New member
May 27, 2007
4
0
Brooklyn
Professional Training

We are on the other side of the country so this isn't a plug for our training. What I can say is that in our experience, all around the world, really good coffee wholesalers provide their customers with espresso training. Without it, given the relatively young state of espresso in the US, there is little or no chance of their customers presenting their coffees at an excellent, let alone, acceptable standard. If you don't know what a truly great coffee looks and tastes like...how can you make one!?

My advice? Search for a coffee supplier who will provide you with free training. They know your success is their success...

Good luck with the great adventure!
 

Latest posts

Top