Need some advice with a very basic coffee question...

joewolf

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Sep 1, 2008
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Hello. I have recently been reading a lot about coffee & trying to improve my home brewing. I read that it''s suggested to use 2 tablespoons of ground coffee per 6 oz of water. I usually brew 4 cups (32 oz) of filtered watered in the morning with less than the suggested amount of coffee. This morning I attempted 10 tablespoons as suggested & my coffee was too strong and I believe rather bitter. Any suggestions? I use a burr grinder & had it set at \"medium.\" Should I measure 2 tablespoons of beans per 6 oz. or 2 tablespoons of coffee after grinding per 6 oz? Any help is greatly appreciated!!
 

roaster dave

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Aug 6, 2008
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Guelph, Ontario
2 tablespoons to 6 oz of water is the standard for gourmet coffee drip brewing. Try agaib with the 8 tablespoons suggested and see how that works out for you.

There is alot of science involved in gourmet brewing. Too little ground coffee and it becomes over extracted (bitter) too much coffee and its over extracted (bad as well). If you brew at the recommended 2 tbs to 6 oz and it is still too strong, add just a little more water to the coffee once it is in your cup.
 
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joewolf

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Roaster Dave: ok I will try that, thank you! Does 1 tablespoon of beans equal roughly 1 tablespoon of ground? (I haven't actual ground and compared yet).

Jlyon10: following 2 tablespoon per 6 oz - and 32 oz of water (32 divided by 6 = 5.333) - 5 x 2 = 10 tablespoons...
 

PinkRose

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Feb 28, 2008
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Near Philadelphia, PA
Hello,

I remember when I used to get confused with the 6 oz. versus the 8 ounce cup. It can be very frustrating trying to find the right coffee and water ratio that's right for your taste. However, once you figure it out, then if you do it the same way each time, you'll be happy with the results.

I could never rely on the water level markers on the drip coffee makers that I've had. They were all very inacurrate. I finally resorted to measuring the water in a large measuring cup and pouring it in the coffee maker. I would multiply 6 x 6 ounces and measure 36 ounces of water, and pour it into the coffee maker. That way, if I wanted to have enough coffee for 4 eight-ounce mugs, (32 ounces) I'd have plenty of coffee, with a little to spare.

If you base your coffee measurements on using the 6 ounces of water per cup, then you should measure the ground coffee accordingly. If you like your coffee mild (like most restaurants serve it) then use one level tablespoon for each 6 ounce cup of water that you put into the coffee maker. If you use 36 ounces of water, then you'd use 6 level tablespoons of ground coffee. Then, if you find that the coffee is too weak, add more coffee the next time that you make it. Maybe try using 8 tablespoons of ground coffee to 36 ounces of water and see how you like it.

It will take some experimenting in order for you to get your coffee to turn out right. Also, as time goes on, you may need to make adjustments based on the kind of coffee that you use. There is a difference in taste when you use darker roast verses a lighter roasted coffee.

I know a lot of people say that when you use a drip coffee maker, you should adjust the volume of water that you use and not adjust the amount of coffee. I tried doing it that way with little success. I prefer to adjust the amount of coffee that I use rather than the amount of water.

I hope this helps you.

Good luck.

Rose
 
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joewolf

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Thanks PinkRose...every little bit of information helps. I already measure via a large measuring cup so I will just continue to re-adjust my ratio of coffee to water.
 

jlyon10

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Feb 16, 2007
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Clemmons, NC
amount of coffee

joewolf said:
Roaster Dave: ok I will try that, thank you! Does 1 tablespoon of beans equal roughly 1 tablespoon of ground? (I haven't actual ground and compared yet).

Jlyon10: following 2 tablespoon per 6 oz - and 32 oz of water (32 divided by 6 = 5.333) - 5 x 2 = 10 tablespoons...

My bad, I thought since you were making 4 cups they were 6 oz so that would be 24 oz of water. It really is a matter of what tastes good to you some people like strong coffee some don't. It is all up to what you like.
 
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joewolf

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No problem. Yes I was making 4 cups, there's 8 oz. in a cup.

I've been playing around and found out that 6-8 teaspoons tastes perfect now in 32 oz. for me...
 

roaster dave

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Aug 6, 2008
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Guelph, Ontario
joewolf said:
Roaster Dave: ok I will try that, thank you! Does 1 tablespoon of beans equal roughly 1 tablespoon of ground? (I haven't actual ground and compared yet).

Jlyon10: following 2 tablespoon per 6 oz - and 32 oz of water (32 divided by 6 = 5.333) - 5 x 2 = 10 tablespoons...

You should grind it before measuring it!
 

espressogirl

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Oct 6, 2008
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Congratulations for finding the ratio that works well for you!

I too follow the standard proportion recommended by experts, but depending on the type of coffee that I brew, I would also adjust accordingly. Coffees from the Asia Pacific region are very bold so in order to mellow down the flavor a notch lower, I add some hot water AFTER the brewing process. :)

I don't alter the standard proportion anymore for it would affect the flavor extraction of the coffee. Given that the grind is just right for the brewer used, and the brewing time is set properly, the extraction will turn out fine. Just adjust after the brewing is done.


joewolf said:
No problem. Yes I was making 4 cups, there's 8 oz. in a cup.

I've been playing around and found out that 6-8 teaspoons tastes perfect now in 32 oz. for me...
 
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