New brewing process: BLOOM BREW

Roger47

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Jan 30, 2019
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After 5 years of experimentation I now have a process that offers a very high quality brew. You will need; a double walled stainless steel French Press and an electric kettle with variable water temperatures. The ground coffee is "fine" and must be a room temperature. The FP must also be at room temperature. Use the FP to pre-measure the water, then run hot tap water into the FP, empty and dry with a paper towel. Pour the ground coffee into the warm FP. Set the kettle to 95C (Very important step). When the water comes up to temp, pour it into the FP quickly. Cover and allow 10 minutes brew time.

The coffee will float to the top (BLOOM) and that is where you want it. Do not disturb it for the 10 minutes. After the 10 minutes, remove the cover (I use a small dish) and with a spoon, poke the BLOOM to allow the remaining coffee to settle out. The CO2 keeps most of the bloom afloat. Remove all the foam and floating material with a spoon and then SLOWLY plunge.

I then run the coffee into a Melita filter system and then into a thermal coffee carafe. The process allows the coffee BLOOM to brew itself. The double walled FP is key to the success as it is not a "thermos" but simply a double walled "AIR" filled. It allows the water temperature to decrease evenly going through the "extraction temperatures". The 95C is critical.

There is no such thing as over extraction. If time was a factor in over extraction, it would not be possible to brew COLD BREWED COFFEE requiring in excess of 12 hours. It is the temperature that creates bitter coffee. Too hot = bitter. Too cold = bitter.
Chhers
Roger
 

topher

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Cold brew can be over-extracted. It is from too fine a grind or from soaking too long. If it works for you keep it up. That being said, I can't imagine it not being over-extracted. Maybe you like over-extracted coffee.
 

Roger47

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Cold brew can be over-extracted. It is from too fine a grind or from soaking too long. If it works for you keep it up. That being said, I can't imagine it not being over-extracted. Maybe you like over-extracted coffee.
Thanks topher. I tried a batch using my process and timed for 4 minutes. The coffee came out spectacular. After my years of experimentation, I stayed with the 10 minutes, which also offers a good brew, I didn't think of going back to the 4 minute point. The coffee offered a very different quality, which we enjoyed! I now don't have to wait 10 minutes lol. On another note, you should give this method a try. Cheers
Roger
 

topher

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Lol. I will be the judge of that. I threw my French press out because I am not completely sure the oils that sit on top of your brewed coffee(from the press) are good for you. I know a friend who switched to filtered coffee and his cholesterol dropped considerably. I will try and pick one up this weekend and try your process next week. I still think it is going to be over-extracted. I will let you know when I try it. ;)
 

Roger47

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Lol. I will be the judge of that. I threw my French press out because I am not completely sure the oils that sit on top of your brewed coffee(from the press) are good for you. I know a friend who switched to filtered coffee and his cholesterol dropped considerably. I will try and pick one up this weekend and try your process next week. I still think it is going to be over-extracted. I will let you know when I try it. ;)
You're absolutely correct on the Cafestol (oil). It is the most dangerous thing you can consume as it relates to cholesterol values. Try my process. You will not be disappointed. The Bloom must remain still and not disturbed. Allow the natural absorption of the water into the coffee. As each particle of coffee becomes full saturated, it descends into the FP. After the "4 minutes", there will be some of the Bloom still floating due to the CO2. Just gently knock it down, scoop the foam and slowly plunge. I then run the coffee through a Melita set up and then into a coffee carafe.
Cheers. Please let me now how it turned out and remember the 95C is critical.
 

Roger47

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Thanks topher. I tried a batch using my process and timed for 4 minutes. The coffee came out spectacular. After my years of experimentation, I stayed with the 10 minutes, which also offers a good brew, I didn't think of going back to the 4 minute point. The coffee offered a very different quality, which we enjoyed! I now don't have to wait 10 minutes lol. On another note, you should give this method a try. Cheers
Roger
The 4 minute brew came out OK but after a while, the brews came out Under Extracted. It needs the full 10 minutes for this process. I must have gotten lucky on that 4 minute brew time.
 
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