organic coffee or regular

malkaNjeff

New member
Aug 13, 2007
37
0
Warrington, PA
I was wondering if the majority of coffee lovers and regular coffee drinkers feel that it may be important to ones health to stick with organic, since it would be grown without the use of harmful pesticides and herbacides.

Any thoughts?

Jeff
PS. I do own an organic site.
 

John P

New member
Jan 5, 2007
1,045
0
Salt Lake City
The proof is in the cup.

The top quality coffees cannot use pesticides or herbicides that would affect the flavor of the coffee. Most top quality coffees are not certified organic, but they may, in fact be organic. There are many organic pesticides and herbicides one can use as well...so probably not a huge factor.

All things being equal, the quality of the coffee is evident by the result in the cup. For me, I'll judge the cup first, and be damn sure that the sustainability of that farm and that crop is far more important that whether the grower is organic or not.

My comments are not relevant to low quality coffee. Chemicals may improve their taste...who knows???? :-D
 

Josh

New member
Sep 17, 2008
34
0
I read from a few books on coffee that "organic" coffee wont usually be better or worse in taste than the normal non organic beans.

The reason given was that this would mostly affect the "cherry" and the seed itself would have pretty much no trace of any chemicals used in growing. I can't say how true this is because I haven’t actually seen any real studies on the topic.

That being said, I think the main reason why a person, when given the option, should go "organic" is because the issue of sustainability. You know... for the kids.

There is also something to be said about the farming practices when going organic. I think it's very possible to get a better bean from an organic operation because of the extra time and care that has to go into growing and harvesting.

The coffee shop my partner and I are opening is all organic themed. Also trying to go as eco friendly as possible when it comes to all of our other items.
 
Sep 7, 2008
49
0
Las Vegas
What's the address to your organic site? I would be interested in checking it out.

Mind you, before the industrial revolution everything was "organic" maybe, insteading of people seeing it as a form elitism, I think it is going back to a more natural way of living. I totally agree with Josh.

Well, I guess I have to. He changes the oil in my car and takes out the garbage!
 

Coffeeexpert

New member
Jun 29, 2008
99
0
USA
The fact that coffee is grown organic or with pesticides, should not affect your health. Any pesticides used would be sprayed on the plant, and as another poster wrote: "In regards to a coffee plant" this would mostly affect the "cherry" and the seed itself would have pretty much no trace of any chemicals used in growing. We are not dealing with strawberries here. Also, just because a coffee is labeled "Organic" doesn't mean it tastes better. In fact, often the opposite is true. More time is required to maintain a farm organically, and the poor farmers don't take the time, or have the resources to maintain their fields. Finally, organic coffee generally costs more. It's up to you if you want to pay for it. Just remember, a label on a bag- "Organic or Fair-Trade" doesn't mean that the coffee will taste any better.
 

ElPugDiablo

New member
Jul 16, 2004
991
0
Hartford and New Haven, CT
jlyon10 said:
Organic any thing is always better for you eventhough in this day and age it is pretty hard to accomplish.
This is not totally correct. Socially and politically, a certain country is clear cutting their rain forest to grow organic coffee. This can't be better than a well managed farm using chemicals. Health-wise during the roasting process the temperature is high enough to evaporate any harmful chemical. This is more of a unfounded concern for chemically processed decaf, and there is no claim that organic coffee is healthier than non-organic coffee. Organic tea on the other hand, is probably worthwhile to seek out as steeping temperature is 175f - 212f. Quality-wise, some organic, fair trade, bird friendly, rainbow alliance and other politically corrected coffees are as good as some capitalist exploitation coffees. I'd seek out the best quality coffee and damn the label.
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,588
2
Central North Carolina
jlyon10 said:
Organic any thing is always better for you eventhough in this day and age it is pretty hard to accomplish.


That's not totally true for some issues. For example, I have life threatening allergies/asthma including extensive food allergies. Based on research my wife and I have done organic foods can actually negatively affect me more than your average/everyday grown foods. Later!
 

Josh

New member
Sep 17, 2008
34
0
shadow745 said:
jlyon10 said:
Organic any thing is always better for you eventhough in this day and age it is pretty hard to accomplish.


That's not totally true for some issues. For example, I have life threatening allergies/asthma including extensive food allergies. Based on research my wife and I have done organic foods can actually negatively affect me more than your average/everyday grown foods. Later!

Well, have fun at mcdonalds! : p
 

lifeline

New member
Jan 9, 2009
8
0
I think the real benefit may not be to the end drinker but the farmer that is growing the coffee.

If they are using chemicals and pesticides I bet a majority of them aren't using proper protection so that they don't breath that stuff in. The stuff also gets into the water supply, just look at what US farmers are doing with the amoung of nitrogen they are dumping into the river. We created or helped in creating a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

The number of deaths each year in these countries from cooking over an open fire. There number one concern isn't about long term health. I think it is for the farmers health as much as anything.
 

essentialwonders

New member
Apr 5, 2007
89
0
Akron, Ohio
I agree it is the quality of bean that makes the difference in the cup of coffee. We personally only use Type I Grade A beans from small farmers who don't use chemicals but the beans are not qualified as organic. These small farms can't afford to become or maintain the organic certification. (It's Not Easy) I personally have not yet tasted in my life an organic cup of coffee that was worth a second taste. It will take allot of time for a qualified farmer to sustain an organic crop and provide a Type I bean before there will be an abundance of quality organic beans on the market. The apple trees in my backyard are 100% organic trees, they grow in the wild and we eat the apples all summer long. If I wanted to sell these apples as Certified Organic I would have to fill out the application. After the application is approved to start the Organic Certification I have to wait 5 full years with yearly inspections of my soil. After the 5 years if my soil proves to be chemical free my certification is approved. So, the application process is long and if you have any accidents at all the standard fine is $10,000 which would put the typical small farm out of business. At this time I see no incentive for any farmer to become certified organic when the majority of all farmers already are without the paperwork. I do believe in eating and drinking smart but you also have to have common sense about what you’re eating and drinking. All in all, I believe Type I Grade A beans from a good small farm; with experienced farmers produce the best coffee beans.
 

jlyon10

Super Moderator
Feb 16, 2007
436
0
Clemmons, NC
I consider my home garden organic but I could never pass these requirements. Power to the farmers. Sounds like a lot of red tape and expense to me.
 
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