Origin of the word "Espresso"

Dunorcaille

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May 29, 2004
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I was wondering if anyone from these forums could tell me the origin of the word "espresso". I was having a discussion with a friend last night about the origin of the word "espresso" and my understanding is that the word relates to the fact that it is a fast serving type of coffee beverage, a cup of small coffee one drinks fast and usually standing (at least in the cafés of Europe), thus the word "espresso", which derives from the word "express" (in France one asks for a cup of espresso by simply asking for an "express"), meaning fast, without stoping, like an express bus service. Am I right or is there a completely different meaning and origin to the word "espresso" coffee? :)
 

Rowley

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Mar 7, 2003
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that was always my understanding, I assumed espresso was italian for express and/or slagn for express coffee.

Does anyone think espesso means anything different?
 
OP
D

Dunorcaille

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The origin of the word "Espresso"

Some think that the word refers to the pressing procedure (in the espresso coffee machine) when making a cup of espresso coffee...
 

ut cham

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Jun 10, 2004
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Vietnam -Nederlands
Espresso is the name to describe the way of making coffee. It can be the best described as follow " a way inwhich coffee in an very short time with pressure can be maked."

perfect time is tussen 18 - 25seconden.

I am not really expert in espresso. But when i find out that vietnamese coffee is so unbelieable suitable when it is usded to made espresso I start to study about this to get adapt to the market which i want to aim my product.

always appreciate to hear from all of your opinion.
 

BeanGrinder

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Aug 11, 2004
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North Georgia, USA
Origin of Espresso

The name is derived from the brief time in which the coffee is exposed to water. This, in turn, effects the speed in which the coffee is produced. The importance of this measurement of time is the resulting level of caffine. The longer the water is exposed to the grounds, the higher the level of caffine. Contrary to public misconception, the espresso process does not create a higher caffine drink. However, the other half of coffee production is the roasting. The Espresso Roast and French Roast bring more oils (and flavor) out in the beans. The roasting process, in turn, impacts the caffine content.

So, if you were to use a light or medium roast in your espresso machine, you'd have a rather low caffine content drink. Whether it would be worth drinking would is another issue. ,:wink:
 

ralphshade

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Jul 28, 2004
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Madison, WI
Espresso

Exactly right Alun. I would also like to mention that there really isn't such a thing as an Espresso Roast such as BeanGrinder mentions. As he mentions, espresso is a method of making a beverage.
 

ernie

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Nov 1, 2004
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philippines
Re: Origin of Espresso

BeanGrinder said:
The name is derived from the brief time in which the coffee is exposed to water. This, in turn, effects the speed in which the coffee is produced. The importance of this measurement of time is the resulting level of caffine. The longer the water is exposed to the grounds, the higher the level of caffine. Contrary to public misconception, the espresso process does not create a higher caffine drink. However, the other half of coffee production is the roasting. The Espresso Roast and French Roast bring more oils (and flavor) out in the beans. The roasting process, in turn, impacts the caffine content.

So, if you were to use a light or medium roast in your espresso machine, you'd have a rather low caffine content drink. Whether it would be worth drinking would is another issue. ,:wink:
 

King Seven

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Nov 20, 2004
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It seems to have no one origin. Most of the specialist authors and historians seem to agree that the word stems from the pressure used (though the word was around long before we were operating around 9bar), from the speed of it and the fact that each one was made expressly for each customer.

I believe the French still use both expresso and espresso for different drinks.
 

redmoose

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Aug 18, 2004
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espresso
/espresso/ (also expresso)

• noun (pl. espressos) strong black coffee made by forcing steam through ground coffee beans.

— ORIGIN from Italian caffè espresso ‘pressed out coffee’.

1945, from It. caffe espresso, from espresso "pressed out," from pp. of esprimere, from L. exprimere "press out" (see express).
Espresso is a strong, flavorful coffee beverage brewed by forcing hot water through finely ground dark-roasted coffee beans. In Italian, espresso means "pressed out" or "express". The term expresso — used often in the United States, even occasionally on menus — is not correct.

Espresso differs greatly from the common drip brewed coffee drink in its thick concentrated consistency, and robust flavor. Due to its potency, straight espresso (espresso served without sweetener or milk, analogous to black coffee) is considered by some to be an acquired taste, and is served in small amounts called shots. Many coffee aficionados order their single or double with a little glass of cold water to clear the palate. Because the espresso reacts quickly with oxygen, it should be consumed right after brewing.

Espresso is often used as the foundation for other drinks, such as lattes, cappuccinos, mochas, and many more. A key component in the flavor of espresso is a golden foam composed of oils, proteins, and sugars, called crema which floats on the surface.
 

garyscottadamson

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Apr 8, 2007
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UK
the word "expresso" realy annoys me as it's an "espresso"
but when you go to france you have to ask for "un expresso" as they don't know what "un espresso" is
 

Carmine Domenaco

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Oct 10, 2007
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Espresso = fast. In Italy is a small drink 1-1.25 oz. that is designed to be finished within a minute whilst standing at the bar.



Alun_evans said:
Actually beans that have been through a lighter roast cycle contain more caffiene than those roasted to say full city or darker. As the bean is subjected to more heat the level of caffiene drops as it is essentially burnt off during the roast process. :grin:

Caffeine is stable to temperatures well beyond the end point for even the darkest roasts. The loss is very, very minimal and if you measured ten 12 oz cups of dark and light roasted coffee both will fall within the same range of mg of caffeine. If you had a swimming pool's worth of coffee you might have a measurable difference of caffeine between the roast levels.

Interestingly, the other compelling argument against drinks made with light roasts having more caffeine has to do with the bulk densities of light and dark roasts. You will find a greater volume of beans per pound when you have a darker roast of a coffee because each bean weighs less. Any loss from the roasting process will be more than made up for by the additional beans it takes to make a pound of dark roast.
 
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