purchasing a roaster in Canada, afterburner needed? customs

pburbridge

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Jul 6, 2006
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Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada
I am looking to purchase a roaster next september and right now it is between and ambex 2kg and a toper 2.5 kg. One of the advantages of the Ambex is the claim that it can roast small batches and be a good sample roaster as you grow. Is this not true of the Toper? Any input would be appreciated.
Also for a roaster this size I read Topper's post that said an afterburner is needed even for this small roaster. Are afterburners really like $4000?!
What about customs costs? are their less fees with the Ambex because it is made in the US and should therefore (I assume) fall under free trade. Whereas, the Toper is made in Turkey and imported to the states and then imported into Canada. Thanks in advance for any help and info

Peter Burbridge
 

morrisn

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Mar 27, 2006
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As far as the customs cost, you really have to talk to Canada Customs, if no one in Canada manufactures a roaster it will probably not make a difference.

As far as the afterburner you have to check with the local agencies in your area and I would ask the question in the form of " I want to install a coffee roaster and want to know what regulations apply. I know a roaster in the city who had to install a afterburner, not because of the emisions but because of complaints about the smell.

As far as the batch sizes go I would talk to people that own them, most roaster manufacturers will supply you with a list of their customers so you can call them and ask their opinions.
 

demetri

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Jul 18, 2006
175
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Winnipeg, MB
If it is made in the US you shouldn't be looking at any customs charges. Just probably GST or HST.

Talk to some brokers before you bring your roaster in. There will probably be some brokerage charges associated with this even if it does fall under free trade and the last thing you want is to have some random broker hold you hostage or have Canada Customs sit on your roaster for a few weeks.

A good broker should be able to tell you what it will cost to bring the roaster in and you can agree to fees before hand to avoid any surprises. A good broker can usually tell you what permits you need if any are required.
 
OP
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pburbridge

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Jul 6, 2006
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Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada
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demetri said:
If it is made in the US you shouldn't be looking at any customs charges. Just probably GST or HST.

Talk to some brokers before you bring your roaster in. There will probably be some brokerage charges associated with this even if it does fall under free trade and the last thing you want is to have some random broker hold you hostage or have Canada Customs sit on your roaster for a few weeks.

A good broker should be able to tell you what it will cost to bring the roaster in and you can agree to fees before hand to avoid any surprises. A good broker can usually tell you what permits you need if any are required.

Thanks for the info. I'll look into brokers, does anyone have any recommendations?

Peter
 

demetri

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Jul 18, 2006
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Winnipeg, MB
Just look in the yellow pages. I use L&L Importing but I believe they're just a Winnipeg venture.

You know the broker is good when they ask you questions that have you saying "I didn't think of that".
 
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pburbridge

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Jul 6, 2006
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Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada
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demetri said:
Just look in the yellow pages. I use L&L Importing but I believe they're just a Winnipeg venture.

You know the broker is good when they ask you questions that have you saying "I didn't think of that".

Ok, will do, just trying to get as much info as I can. Right now I am in Korea and won't be home until late August, so it is a little hard to make concrete plans or deals with anyone. Just trying to get an idea of what to expect when I get home. Btw how is the coffee scene in Winipeg?

Peter
 

demetri

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Winnipeg, MB
You can't swing a dead cat without hitting a Starbucks. There's a Safeway (grocery store) in the heart of the city with a Starbucks in the store and a starbucks in the parkinglot.

There is also a mall in the south end with one particular spot that is about 100 ft away from three different starbucks locations.

It doesn't seem to be hurting the second cup or Tim Horton's. If anything Tim's is a lot busier than starbucks.
 
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pburbridge

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Jul 6, 2006
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Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada
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demetri said:
You can't swing a dead cat without hitting a Starbucks. There's a Safeway (grocery store) in the heart of the city with a Starbucks in the store and a starbucks in the parkinglot.

There is also a mall in the south end with one particular spot that is about 100 ft away from three different starbucks locations.

It doesn't seem to be hurting the second cup or Tim Horton's. If anything Tim's is a lot busier than starbucks.

Interesting, Starbucks is only starting to invade Halifax. How about the specialty high end scene are there many quality cafes or roasters?

Peter
 

demetri

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Jul 18, 2006
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Winnipeg, MB
There are a lot of great Cafe's here, though my two favorite ones have now closed up shop.

There were three high end roasters that have now merged into just one. There are a few other coffee service companies in town that roast their own beans but I wouldn't call them "high quality". They're pretty average.

There was a Melrose Coffee plant in the city that shut down a few years back. It used to be my favorite spot to drive by on my way to school. The aroma of fresh roasted coffee beans was quite invigorating.
 

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