Smoke and Odor

fugsco

New member
Jan 8, 2007
1
0
Omaha, NE
Hi. I'm part of new-ish roasting company and we're beginning to have troubles with our neighbors. We're in a mixed use area and there are houses near us that are irritated by the sights and smells of our roasting. It is worst, of course, with darker roasts. We now do our French in the very early morning and so far this has helped. Of course we've looked at the blowers and dispersal units but are unsure of their effectiveness. We really don't want to afford at this stage to go for the full incinerator, though that would surely be the final solution. Any tricks? Tips? Thanks!
 

Baugo

New member
Nov 24, 2006
78
0
Have you considered taller stacks? I read somewhere that it was a successful solution to a similar problem. But I have also heard that taller stacks have affected the roast environment. Don’t know if that helps but maybe a thought.
 

johng99

New member
Feb 3, 2006
16
0
I have dealt with odor issues in the past ( I worked as a plant engineer in a pet food plant). Essentially the odor intensity will drop exponentially (alot) with height. So yes, raising your stack will reduce your odor problem on all but the most balmy days! Especially if you can get your stack above the roof line of neighboring houses. Smoke however, may be improved a bit by height, but you never know.
 

CafeBlue

New member
Dec 8, 2006
121
0
Toronto
Tall chimney stacks help significantly and also mitigate the chances of a neighbor or passerby calling the fire department because your roof looks like it is on fire.
Afterburner/incinerator can effectively eliminate odor and particulate emissions, but may easily cost more to purchase, install and operate than the roaster.
Research a few plans of action now, before you have a cranky neighboir or a demanding inspector forcing you to act hastily.
 

topher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2003
3,736
13
Boca Raton
You do not have to run afterburners??!! Find out what you have to do code wise. If you do not have to run afterburners then the neighbors are well out of luck :shock:
 

La Crema Coffee

New member
Oct 9, 2005
245
0
Northwest Washington State
Well, actually in my area I do not need an afterburner due to the small size of my roaster, " E-MAIL From: Northwest Clean Air Agency

Troy Allen

Northwest Java

Dear Troy,

Thank you for stopping by this morning to inquire about new source review (NSR) approval and permitting requirements. You requested a NSR determination for a single, Dietrich Model IR-3FM batch coffee roaster (http://www.diedrichroasters.com/ir3.html). This roaster has a 25 lb/hour roasting capacity and uses 12,000 Btu/hour of propane. Based on potential to emit calculations using emission factors from EPA AP-42 for coffee roasting and propane combustion, this unit would not be required to submit a Notice of Construction or be required to proceed through the NSR process in accordance with Northwest Clean Air Agency (NWCAA) Regulation Section 300, before operating in our jurisdiction. Please understand that this determination is based on the information you have submitted and emission estimates that are currently available. In addition, Section 300 includes a Control Officer’s (Director’s) discretionary provision that allows the agency to require a new source to go through NSR based on “the nature of air pollution emissions from the stationary source and its potential effect on health, economic and social factors, or physical effects on property”. Because coffee roasters have the potential to cause odor problems in an area, the agency may choose to exercise this provision, especially if odor complaints are received from the public.

Thank you for your interest in understanding and complying with applicable air pollution rules and regulations.

Sincerely,

Dan Mahar, PE

Air Quality Engineer

Northwest Clean Air Agency

1600 South Second Street

Mount Vernon , Washington USA

360-428-1617 extension 203"

And having said that if ANYONE complained enough to the clean air folks would make me comply with code due to nuisance complaints, not the actual emissions.
 

johng99

New member
Feb 3, 2006
16
0
Tell us more about your roasting environment - how large are your batches? How are you exhausting to the outside? Diameter of pipe? How high? Do you clear your roofline? How many feet of pipe do you have? How close are the persons complaining? Do you have a local ordinance for odor? All of there are important factors in understanding your situation and our ability to help.
Height is an extremely important factor, as odor is difficult to control and height helps to disperse.
Good luck!
 

Davec

New member
Oct 18, 2006
314
0
Old England (UK)
A friend of mine used n electrostatic scrubber to remove particulates. It's square fits in the roasting flu line and has a cassette type cartridge that can be removed for cleaning.
 

Davec

New member
Oct 18, 2006
314
0
Old England (UK)
NW JAVA said:
Dave, I wanted to let you know that I've spent a bit of time at your wiki, and I really like it, and I'm impressed. KUDO

Thanks, well i'm always on the look out for new content, so feel free to add any "knowledge" or "nonsense" to the Wiki, even interesting coffee stories....such as my fictional and humerous 3 part series on a coffee newbie joning forums, starting home roasting and still to be written.... Upgrading his kit.
 

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