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JavaQuest

New member
Dec 16, 2004
2
0
Baltimore, MD
Hello All! I am a new member and spent a couple of hours today reading through the forum. There is a lot of good information here. It's good to hear so many people doing well in the business and seeming to like what they do.

I have put together a business plan for a coffee shop in Maryland and would really appreciate some input on some of the numbers I am basing it on.

Payroll: 25% of Gross Sales
Rent: 10%
Product Cost: 25%
Paper, Cups, Supplies, etc,: 6%
Utiltities: 3%

Average Price of an espresso based drink is $2.41
Average Price of a cup of brewed coffee is $1.38
A shop can use 130 to 210 pounds of coffee in a week at an average of 38 drinks per pound.

Any input would be appreciated.
Thanx,
JavaQuest
 

cafemakers

New member
Nov 3, 2004
576
0
Hi JavaQuest,

The number that really jumps out at me from your figures is the volume of coffee that you are planning to use, thus implying your volume of sales. Am I correctly interpreting that you plan to regularly serve 700-1200 beverages per day, 7 days a week?

This is certainly possible, we have customers in very high traffic areas with established brands that can do this, but I would be interested to know what metrics were used to anticipate customer traffic. It seems a little risky to plan your expenses on a percentage of sales when that sales revenues figure is an unknown variable.

Best of success,

Andrew
 
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J

JavaQuest

New member
Dec 16, 2004
2
0
Baltimore, MD
  • Thread Starter
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Hello Andrew,
Thank you for replying. I don't actually expect that I could use even 100 punds of coffee in a week. The 130-210 was a quote that I mostly placed there for the 38 drinks per pound info.

I would like to use 100 pounds per week, which appearently would yield 3,786 drinks. I'm looking at upwards of $.50 per cup product cost. Is this realistic?

A better question... What is the percentage of Gross Sales that you spend on Product Cost Inventory, Supplies (cups, etc.), and payroll?

Scott
 

topher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2003
3,724
11
Boca Raton
I think that includes retail sales of coffee. I read over the stats on your e-imports link....or should I say skimmed...one thing that through me was the average cup size used.... The average coffee cup size is 9 ounces. I haven't seen cups under 12 oz being used regularly since the early to mid 90's...just curious
 

Ellie

New member
Dec 27, 2004
86
0
GA
How did you come up with 38 cups to the pound? I am also doing research in advance of opening a coffee bar, and this info is helpful to me. I have been trying to get a handle on what product sales mix to use - out of total coffee sales, what percent could be expected to be espresso, cappucino, etc. etc. To the group: what have you experienced owners found?

Thanks for your input!
 

ElPugDiablo

New member
Jul 16, 2004
991
0
Hartford and New Haven, CT
Ellie,

I was wondering about that too, until I backed some numbers into it,

1 pound = 450 grams

brewed coffee, assuming average order is 16 oz,
16 oz cup of coffee = 12 grams
450 grams / 12 grams per cups = 38 cups

espresso, assuming equal amount of single and double shots orders, then average order is 1.5 shot
1 shot = 8 grams
1.5 shot = 12 grams
450 grams / 12 grams per cups = 38 cups

I think as a rough estimate, it's a good starting point.
 

everydaygourmet

New member
Nov 15, 2004
45
0
ElPugDiablo said:
Ellie,

I was wondering about that too, until I backed some numbers into it,

1 pound = 450 grams

brewed coffee, assuming average order is 16 oz,
16 oz cup of coffee = 12 grams
450 grams / 12 grams per cups = 38 cups

espresso, assuming equal amount of single and double shots orders, then average order is 1.5 shot
1 shot = 8 grams
1.5 shot = 12 grams
450 grams / 12 grams per cups = 38 cups

I think as a rough estimate, it's a good starting point.

I would agree, that # is pretty darn accurate - we use 35 drinks net per lb (dialing in shots, grinder adjustment, waste, etc) as our basis. and it seems to hold pretty darn true in our first month of being open.
 
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