Why not use a manual drip???

richedie

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Jan 25, 2005
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Hey everyone,

I wonder why more people just don't use a large manual drip maker in the home. In my opinion, it makes a better cup than most auto drip units I have experienced. You have more control over the components of a good cup and a manual drip unit is a heck of a lot cheaper than a good automatic drip unit plus less clean up. Our manual drip has been procuding some incredibly smooth and flavorful coffee.

Thoughts???
 

mrgnomer

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Jan 22, 2006
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Canada
richedie said:
Hey everyone,

I wonder why more people just don't use a large manual drip maker in the home. In my opinion, it makes a better cup than most auto drip units I have experienced. You have more control over the components of a good cup and a manual drip unit is a heck of a lot cheaper than a good automatic drip unit plus less clean up. Our manual drip has been procuding some incredibly smooth and flavorful coffee.

Thoughts???

I used to use an automatic drip because I didn't know about anything else. That's probably the case with the majority of coffee drinkers who buy pre ground beans from the store, load up their machine before going to bed (if they've got an automatic) to brew just before they get up.

It took internet research for me, ironically when I was looking for a replacement drip maker, to find out about how to make a truly good cup of coffee.

The knowledge about good coffee was costly. Instead of ending up spending maybe $80 on a new drip maker I've ended up spending over $2000 for a vacuum brewer, home roasting machine and an espresso set up.

The great coffee I'm getting, on the other hand, is priceless. There is no cafe I've been to yet short of one Italian cafe where I've had coffee or espresso even close to what I now make.

Absolutely, if you know what the ideal range is for coffee brewing a kettle, burr grinder, fresh beans and a french press will make better coffee than any automatic drip.

Automatic drip, IMHO, has become the preferred method of coffee making only because of convenience and because the majority of North American's who only know stale coffee shop coffee don't know anything else. I'm sure if a good portion of people who are led to believe that good coffee is beyond them find out how really easy and inexpensive good coffee can be they'd chuck their drip makers in favour of good beans and manual control. I did.
 
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richedie

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Jan 25, 2005
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So the vacuum brewer is manual? I am not familiar with that set up!

Right now I use a lot of manual drip and the coffee comes out as good or better than the best shops in town and for cheap! I do use good beans, ensure they are locally roasted and grind right before brew.

I also enjoy my percolator at times and my french press. But, I wonder if my blade grinder is the reason my coffee can be hit or miss with these two brewing methods. For a while I couldn't make a bad cup with the french press, now I can't make a good one! For this reason I have mostly been brewing manual drip lately and it beats any auto drip I have had, hands down!

I have asked two respected roasters in philly and both said manual drip and french press are their recommended home brewing method.

I think I rather enjoy manual drip because I can grind the coffee rather medium/fine and pour the water just under the boiling point and still get the smoothest, most flavorful cup. I assume because much of the bitterness or oils are trapped by the filter.
 

mrgnomer

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Jan 22, 2006
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Canada
richedie said:
So the vacuum brewer is manual? I am not familiar with that set up!...

But, I wonder if my blade grinder is the reason my coffee can be hit or miss with these two brewing methods. For a while I couldn't make a bad cup with the french press, now I can't make a good one!

From what I've read the vacuum brewing method actually came before the french press. It's a neat process and I think it makes a smoother cup.

Over or underextraction during the brewing process makes a difference in the cup. Uneven grind, water too hot or not hot enough, steep times, water quality...these could all be a factor. Blade grinders don't grind evenly so that could be it.
 
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richedie

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Jan 25, 2005
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I never notice the Melitta picking up flavors assuming you rinse after use and soak it once in a while.
 
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