100% Pure Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee in Whole Bean ? ? ?

hardwire

New member
Dec 13, 2006
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Hi, first timer poster, long time reader here... :D


I'm looking for some place to find the best 100% Pure & Fresh Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee in Whole Bean Form.


I'm specifically looking for non-wallenford Jamaican. I've tried it and it hasn't been as good as some other JBM that I've drank. However, all those experiences were in a coffee shop, not at home.

Now that I have a nice vaccum air pot, and a good burr grinder for home use, I'd like to find some great fresh beans.

Does anyone here buy 100% Pure & Fresh Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee in Whole Bean Form?

Please comment if you have bought it brewed in a coffee shop or if you have bought whole bean. Also, all other comments welcome! :)
 

Coffee Guy

New member
Oct 19, 2003
874
0
Seattle,Washington USA
Hey HW:

There are some other smaller farms on Jamaica. Wallenford is just more well known. For example we buy direct from a smaller farm, however, since they produce even lesser than the Wallenford farm, it makes their supply even more limited. Then I sometimes have to go back to Wallenford and purchase. I'm sure there are other roasters out there that may run across the same issues I run through. What part of the country are you located in? You might be able to find a roaster in your area that you may be able to purchase from. As for the Wallenford, that too is a good coffee. I just feel that the smaller farm I purchase from is great but the supply is smaller... 8)
 

Jackson

New member
Aug 22, 2006
108
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Columbus, OH
I agree with Coffee Guy. Jamaica is too small to have different coffee regions. If you find a specific grade of coffee bean grown at a specific elevation, chances are, there are several other farms growing that same bean.
I also find that I can't replicate the great flavor of brewed coffee at home vs. my favorite coffee house. Their equipment brews a better cup than my french press. My biggest problem is my blade grinder. When I can afford a burr grinder, I believe the quality of my coffee will be better!!!
 

CafeBlue

New member
Dec 8, 2006
121
0
Toronto
Hi Jackson;
Jamaica may be small, but she is mighty and plenty powerful enough to boast more than one growing region (and several grades)!
Not all Jamaican coffee is from the "blue mountain" growing region. In fact, one of the largest estate farms (possibly THE largest) in Jamaica is the Baronhall Estate affiliated with Jamaica Standard Products - their coffee is classified as "Jamaican High Mountain Supreme" not "Blue Mountain". Not only is it a different appellation or region (you can find the town of Mandeville on a map), the coffee tastes different from Wallensford, Mavis Bank Central Factory, Strawberry Hill and others.
Furthermore, factors other than a geographically prescribed growing region can and do impact coffee cup characteristics. For starters: Altitude, micro-climate, shade, soil composition, soil condition, fertilization, irrigation, coffee tree species (e.g. arabica, robusta), coffee tree variety (e.g. typica, caturra, catuai, bourbon), processing methods (e.g. washed, dry preparation, pulped natural), grade (i.e. screening and sorting standards), roasting, packaging, and quality management at several stages.
This is not to say that one can not find very similar coffee from two different farms in the same region, because we can. It also happens that a single farm can produce several different coffee grades, and even different varieties of trees, yielding distinctly different cup characteristics.
The incredible diversity and complexity of coffee is part of the appeal and delight in tasting new and interesting coffees.
Best regards.
 
OP
H

hardwire

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Dec 13, 2006
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  • Thread Starter
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Thank you Coffeeguy, Jackson, & Cafeblue for your replies :)

Wow, this forum is active & I applaud your great wealth of information!
 

Jackson

New member
Aug 22, 2006
108
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Columbus, OH
Wow Cafeblue, you know Jamaican coffee farms! In my generalization of comparing Jamaican coffee, I wanted to compare apples with apples. Coffee beans grown at the same altitude and coffees of the same grade.

Which coffee farm is your favorite? Can I buy a pound or two of green, to roast at home?
 
OP
H

hardwire

New member
Dec 13, 2006
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  • Thread Starter
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Well I went and ordered 2 pounds, 1 for me and 1 for a gift ;) That's a good reason to order 2 pounds worth of this delicious brew! I'll let you know when it arrives and how it turns out! WOOHOO!!!
 

wolfgang

New member
Dec 28, 2006
2
0
Amber estate

About two years ago I sampled many Blue Mountains and the absolute winner (by a wide margin) was the Amber Estate). I got it from www.ja-direct.com .

All other Blue Mountains I tasted where not worth the hyped up price tag.
 

ericburns95

New member
Dec 2, 2006
11
0
hanover pa
jamacian blue

well it is good to rad about folks with some knowledge but i will go out on a limb and say that of all the blue that i have tried i would not perfer it over some costa rican private estate coffees that i have had and since cannot find anymore like san juanilio or even blue star tarrazu the daterra brazil coffees rank preety high also in my opinion so it goes back to price vs quality or percieved quality
 

rgunson

New member
Jul 21, 2008
7
0
London, England
we are an online coffee roaster in the London, England
we sell Jamaican Blue Mountain No.1 from Flamstead Estate
we only roast your JBM after we receive your order
IMHO it improves if you leave it sealed in the bag for 10 days, out of direct sunlight or other heat source
this idea about it being best when it is so fresh it is still warm out of the roaster is an urban myth, IMHO
 

ericburns95

New member
Dec 2, 2006
11
0
hanover pa
well folks i just got from a friend who has family in jamaica 4 oz of gold cup coffee from the isle itself anybody ever heard of this company? i am trying it tomorrow i did not roast this but i will give honest reviews

cheers
eric
 
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