Authentic Cappuccino recipe

A4dable

New member
Jan 11, 2005
1
0
California
Could anyone recommend a "Great" recipe book with authentic recipes? I have three different books with three different recipes. I'm opening a mobile specialty coffee truck. I am looking for great recipes that will have my customers saying, "That's better than _________!" :grin:

So, I decided to go to a local espresso shop to check out my competition. I ordered a cappuccino & my husband ordered a latte. The Barista pulled a carafe out of the refrigerator & started to pour the dark brown liquid into the frothing pitcher. I said "what are you doing?" she said, "We make our espresso ahead of time and store it in the refrigerator!" I said, "I would like it made fresh!" To which she replied, OK.

She started to make the espresso, when my husband called me over. He had a better vantage point than I. He said, "Did you see what she did?" I replied, "I couldn't see from where I was." He said, "She did not use any shot glasses. She ran the espresso into the drip tray and then drained the tray into the milk." At that point I exclaimed, "You didn't use a shot glass!" She replied, "That is how it's done!" :shock: I said, "We don't want anything!" :roll:
 

barefoot

New member
Sep 21, 2004
75
0
Santa Clara, CA
That is darned scary! But hey at elast using the drip tray they can keep pulling those awesome 6 ounces in 7 seconds "single" espressos and not have to worry about overflowing the container.

If you are in Northern california San Jose area or nearby you should come by and try our cappuccino. We serve a pretty decent one. I actually had a cubano Macchiato this morning from one of our baristas that made me weep with joy it was so good. I was shouting and jumping and dancing with joy for hours.

BTW there is only ONE way to make a cappuccino in my book:
double shot of espresso - 2 ounces MAXIMUM volume poured directly into a hot ceramic 6 ounce cup
perfectly steamed silky smooth no foam no bubble milk poured on top with beautiful latte art.

there is no such thing as a large cappuccino.

but then again we are completely insane about coffee.
 

NW JAVA

New member
Augh! no microfoam to carry the incredable essense of the shot? No foam and just liquid milk equals a latte' Maybe I'm off track or missed somthing, but seems to me that I know what I'm talking about. ;)...Oh you meant microfaon as in " silky smooth milk" My misunderstanding from symantix.
 

Ellie

New member
Dec 27, 2004
86
0
GA
making a cap

The novices are getting confused :-D Andy, are you saying that you pull the double shot of espresso directly into the already steamed milk? And are you also saying that you do not foam the milk at all? Clear things up for me, please. :(

Thanks,Ellie
 

barefoot

New member
Sep 21, 2004
75
0
Santa Clara, CA
Sorry.

so here is what WE do (doesn't mean we are the only way...)

We steam the milk to a perfectly silky, velvety texture with NO visible air bubbles. It should roll smoothly and be dense and thick like heavy cream. It should look like white chrome on top as it reflects light. NOT dry styrofoam and NOT just hot milk. The whole milk is a similar texture with a tad less thickness at the bottom.

We pour the double shots directly into a preheated 6-7 ounce ceramic cup. the espresso is between 1.75 -2 ounces total volume in about 25 seconds.

then we slowly pour the silky smooth velvet microfoam milk into the espresso floating the espresso on top so the crema stays on top of the milk. We always pour latte art cause it looks pretty, is fun and people love it.

so the secret is the RATIO of 1/3 rd espresso to 2/3rds milk. roughly 1/2 of the milk part is more thick than the rest so it is sort of 1/3rd espresso, 1/3rd silky milk and 1/3rd thicker silky milk.

that is my defitinition of a cappuccino. We call it the Barefoot Cappuccino.
 

Ellie

New member
Dec 27, 2004
86
0
GA
Andy,

That really cleared things up :) :) :)

Sounds yummy, I think i'll go try to make one right now :wink: However, could you first explain what the difference is between your cappuccino and your latte, b/c your cappucinno sounds more to my uneducated mind like a latte.

Thanks
Ellie
 

janie1963

New member
Mar 8, 2004
65
0
forgive the question, but I've not heard of a cubana macchiato. Would love to know more about it.
 

CoffeeBlends

New member
Jan 20, 2005
7
0
NEBRASKA
Hurray! Barefoot! :grin:
A real Italian style cappuccino. I Love It!
This confusion happens so often that we have an American Style Cap on our menu as well as an Italian Style Cap.
It's all in the pour, if you are lifting the foam off with a slated spoon or something of that sort you are making an American Style Cap. If as you pour the (thick creamy heavy, yada yada) milk as you are making the cap, you will have an Italian Style Cap.
 
G

Guest

Guest
authentic cappuccino

Hello; just a small note from a norwegian barista here; -it is all in the color of the beverage!
The name 'cappuccino' is in italian language referring to the color of the robes of the monks of the capucin order -a branch of the Benedictian order of monks. The Capucins founded their new order in the 16th century, and chose red-brownish robes to wear to be singled out from the others. Well-known in 19th century Italy, Austria, France and Spain, these monks founded monestaries in many countries.
The referring to a coffee-drink probably stems from Austria, where in coffee-houses the different drinks all had names. 'Cappuccino' (or 'kapuziner' in austrian) means 'little capucin' and was dark coffee with hot milk.
The espresso and the steamed milk came later, but underneath the frothy milk on top should be a beverage of nice capucin color.
In Austria you can still get a 'kapuziner' as well as a 'franziskaner' -another monk with a different, lighter brown (more milk) robe :)
In Rome, there is a small street called Via Cappuccini leading up to a monestary with a mystic crypt with the remains of hundreds of capucin monks decorating the walls and vaults -all parts of the sceletons used as decorative elments in the plaster -and a dozen or so whole sceletons standing guard -in their robes.
In Paris, the Boulevard des Capucines passes by the Opera and the Café de la Paix -
In Barcelona the main street Rambla changes name to Capucine in the upper end.
In northern Italy the baristas more often than in the south make artsy hearts etc in their cappuccinos, but the drinks are never as large as in the US. The words ending '-ino' indicates this is not an ordinairy capucin, but a small one.

So much for the italian.

Love from John in Oslo
 

coffee_beanz

New member
May 6, 2005
12
0
Souther U.S.A.
Re: authentic cappuccino

skylark/guest said:
Hello; just a small note from a norwegian barista here; -it is all in the color of the beverage!
The name 'cappuccino' is in italian language referring to the color of the robes of the monks of the capucin order -a branch of the Benedictian order of monks.

Oslo John is headed in the right direction, but during my tenure in seminary, we understood that it was the hoods on our robes that inspired the name, because the cap of foam on top of the cup reminded those in the village of the monks' robes. But then, they also taught us to question everythings in seminary!
 
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