Coffee "connoisseurs"...

omegapd

New member
Sep 4, 2008
31
0
Deep South, GA
Hey All,

A recent thread by cartoons10 about MJB coffee got me to thinking...

How many of the true connoisseurs here still have a favorite, inexpensive, grocery store type coffee? If not, do you just forego coffee when eating out at restaurants or what do you do?

Personally, I still have a couple of old grocery store favorites that I grew up with and will continue to drink, even though I've gotten pretty accustomed to fresh roasted coffee and grinding my own beans.

Opinions? Friendly banter? What says you? :wink:

Eric
 

caffe biscotto

New member
Jan 18, 2008
704
0
MASS.
jlyon10 said:
I will drink coffee in a restarurant depending on the restaurant.
Jim, I'm surprised if you don't take your own coffee to a restaurant. :D

Some restaurants/diners serve locally roasted coffee that is above average.

Favorite, inexpensive, grocery store type coffee?
I was a Folgers & Maxwell House guy before I got into fresh roasts.
 

espressogirl

New member
Oct 6, 2008
39
0
Since I started drinking gourmet coffee, my palate has expanded to accommodate the various flavors imaginable. There's a certain thrill in trying out new concoctions, or even coffee from different regions in the world.

I started my coffee journey drinking instant coffee as a kid but when I learned more about coffee and its intricacies, the more my horizon stretched further. Flavor-wise, there is a huge difference between instant slash grocery coffee and those fancy gourmet coffee. But for me, it's all about personal experiences.

The joy I get from drinking instant coffee with good friends is no match to the disappointment I feel drinking an expensive cup of coffee in a fancy cafe served with a frown by a grumpy barista.

For me, being a coffee connoisseur should go beyond what you know about coffee. :wink:
 

pbmac

New member
Aug 1, 2008
18
0
I am willing to try coffee in a restaurant at least once - and am occassionally delighted when I find someplace that brews a flavorful cup of coffee.

I started out as a Folgers fan....but once I started home roasting I have never gone back....

Let me ask you all a question - I go to my favorite coffee place (whatever it is) and get wonderful coffee - full of flavor, its BOLD, its has a great personality. I buy their beans from their shop and bring it home - I brew up a pot in my French press and it doesn't taste anywhere near the same. I have tried letting it sit for longer, tried more grounds, less grounds...and still can't get the same taste.

Is it their brewing process?? Any thoughts??

Thanks

pbmac
 

JohnB

New member
May 30, 2008
113
0
Connecticut
pbmac said:
Let me ask you all a question - I go to my favorite coffee place (whatever it is) and get wonderful coffee - full of flavor, its BOLD, its has a great personality. I buy their beans from their shop and bring it home - I brew up a pot in my French press and it doesn't taste anywhere near the same. I have tried letting it sit for longer, tried more grounds, less grounds...and still can't get the same taste.

Is it their brewing process?? Any thoughts??

Thanks

pbmac

What are you using for a grinder? How much coffee/water? Brew time? Water temp? I grind 32g of beans for 16oz of water in my press pot. Lately I've been steeping for 5-6 minutes, stirring down the grounds after 3 minutes.
 

pbmac

New member
Aug 1, 2008
18
0
Using a bur grinder set to about half way on the dial...using about 1 heaping tablespoon of grounds per cup of water.... Boiling water...steep for about 4 or 5 minutes....

Perhaps change my grind and try more time...
 

espressogirl

New member
Oct 6, 2008
39
0
Hmm, the "boiling water" caught my attention.

I would just like to share something related to this. One of the pillars in coffee brewing is never to boil coffee. Since a cup of coffee is 98% water, the quality of water should be appropriate.

Water should be heated to just off a boil, which is roughly 195F-205F or 90C-96C. This is the ideal temperature to extract the coffee's full range of flavors. If you are using a coffee press and has prepared boiling water, you could let the water stand for a few seconds before you pour it into the coarsely ground coffee.


pbmac said:
Using a bur grinder set to about half way on the dial...using about 1 heaping tablespoon of grounds per cup of water.... Boiling water...steep for about 4 or 5 minutes....

Perhaps change my grind and try more time...
 

JohnB

New member
May 30, 2008
113
0
Connecticut
Yea, always let the water settle down from a boil for a few seconds. I pull my press pot water from the hot water tap on my Vivaldi. Typically it is around 200-202*f when I pour it in the press.

As to the amount of coffee I measured the grounds today after weighing out about 33g of beans. For 16oz of water I'm using 6 tblsp of coarsely ground coffee. This is a measured Tblsp not a heaping Tblsp.

As far as your grinder setting it sounds like you are in the Drip range. I've tried that but prefer a coarse grind for my press pot.
 

espressogirl

New member
Oct 6, 2008
39
0
In addition for you to achieve that perfect cup, always make sure your storage procedures are correct.

Like what we all know, coffee is considered fresh produce so keeping it fresh should be your primary concern.

Let's just say that coffee has "enemies": moisture, oxygen, heat and light. When you store your beans, keep these away as much as possible for your coffee to stay fresh. Using super air-tight containers and keeping them in a dry cool place are standard.


pbmac said:
good point...will take that into consideration as I persue that perfect cup :)
 
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