Help Please: Breville Barista Express - need milk frothing help

EBacchus

New member
Jan 17, 2020
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0
Hi everyone,
New to the forum.
I purchased my machine last year, and ive been teaching myself how to froth milk properly for art purposes. I've been having trouble and i am looking for advice.
Basically i end up frothing too much (way too much foam and dense) or too little (not enough foam incorporated its too liquidy and not silky).

Alot of videos always say to keep the wand an inch or so below the surface of the milk and whirl. There is even an indicator on the machine's wand to make it easier.
HOWEVER, I've read some tips from people with this machine that this isnt the case. If I leave the wand tip in at the same depth the entire time, it will incorporate too much air/steam and not give the correct ratio (too frothy).
People have said to leave the wand tip in near the surface to create a ton of air/foam till around 90 degress F. Then from 90-145 degrees F, bury the wand to the bottom and whirl.

I've had some success with this but hard to pinpoint the issue.

I'm also thinking my pitcher may be too big for the amount of milk im using. The ideal amount of milk in the pitcher should be around 9-10oz but my cups are around 7-7.5 oz. I always have leftover milk in the pitcher which is the milk that will really help with the art. I just bought 10oz cups and i will try these out.

Just wondering if anyone with this machine has some tips for frothing.

Thank you!
 

czcusco

New member
Oct 22, 2019
31
0
Subscribed... I’ve been having problems getting it consistently as well... [emoji30]
 
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EBacchus

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Jan 17, 2020
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As the milk is frothed and air is incorporated, the volume will increase correct. So initially, the wand is 1inch below the original surface. As the milk level rises, I have to make sure the wand is still only 1inch below the surface (raising the wand as the milk rises up until about 100 degrees F). This was what was recommended as a tip.The wand has a little indicator on it to mark 1inch, so it makes it a bit easier to keep track of how deep it is. Once it hits 100degrees, then I should bury the wand to the bottom.
 

MntnMan62

New member
Nov 15, 2019
445
1
New Jersey
As the milk is frothed and air is incorporated, the volume will increase correct. So initially, the wand is 1inch below the original surface. As the milk level rises, I have to make sure the wand is still only 1inch below the surface (raising the wand as the milk rises up until about 100 degrees F). This was what was recommended as a tip.The wand has a little indicator on it to mark 1inch, so it makes it a bit easier to keep track of how deep it is. Once it hits 100degrees, then I should bury the wand to the bottom.

I think what @eBacchus is saying is that as you build up foam you should not allow the want to rise with the foam and instead keep it at the same level it was at originally. Then once you hit the 90 degree point, move the want deeper still until you are done.
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,594
4
Central North Carolina
bump - still looking for any advice

Awhile back I made/posted a video of me texturing whole milk for a family member using my Silvia. I posted it as some of the coffee dweebs on Reddit were on and on about having to use an articulating wand for proper milk texture. Well lmao on that as you can use a fixed wand and simply angle the pitcher... Who would've thunk, lmaoa?!? Want me to post the video of how I texture milk as it's excellent microfoam for any use? I'm not a milk based drink enthusiast or care for latte art, but can easily texture any type of milk, etc. when needed.
 

Musicphan

Active member
May 11, 2014
1,508
2
Kansas City
Yes, you need a properly sized pitcher (or it helps a lot at a minimum), the richer the fat content the easier to froth. There is somewhat type steps in the process... you first want to create texture in your milk. Put the steam want tip close to the surface, as the milk heats up you will need to lower your pitcher to maintain the same depth below the milk. When you are doing this make sure the milk is rotating, best to angle the wand/pitcher so you get nice movement. Once you get the right milk stretch/expansion is when you submerge the want into the bottom of the pitcher. Hold the pitcher in your hand, when its screaming hot to touch that's about the right temp. While your learning I recommend using a thermometer.
 

czcusco

New member
Oct 22, 2019
31
0
Awhile back I made/posted a video of me texturing whole milk for a family member using my Silvia. I posted it as some of the coffee dweebs on Reddit were on and on about having to use an articulating wand for proper milk texture. Well lmao on that as you can use a fixed wand and simply angle the pitcher... Who would've thunk, lmaoa?!? Want me to post the video of how I texture milk as it's excellent microfoam for any use? I'm not a milk based drink enthusiast or care for latte art, but can easily texture any type of milk, etc. when needed.

Yes could you post a vid? Thx
 
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EBacchus

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Jan 17, 2020
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Put the steam want tip close to the surface, as the milk heats up you will need to lower your pitcher to maintain the same depth below the milk. When you are doing this make sure the milk is rotating, best to angle the wand/pitcher so you get nice movement. Once you get the right milk stretch/expansion is when you submerge the want into the bottom of the pitcher. Hold the pitcher in your hand, when its screaming hot to touch that's about the right temp. While your learning I recommend using a thermometer.

Yep, this is what I was trying to describe for the most part (sorry for the confusion as other's mentioned). Keeping the wand at the same depth level up until 90 degrees or so, after that, dropping the wand to the bottom of the pitcher until 145 degrees. However I've watched alot of tutorial videos as well that pretty much say to leave the wand near the surface throughout the entire process (not burying the wand as i just mentioned). What Musicphan said seems to be the standard process.

The only reason I've been doing this 2-step approach is because some people who have the Breville Barista Express have recommended this. With this specific machine, it seems that if you dont bury the wand after 90degress or so, the milk gets way too much air incorporated and its over-frothed. That's why I was hoping to get any advice from people who have this machine, since it is a popular one. Its consistently rated as the best machine under 1000$ but the milk frothing does have its quirks.

I definitely get the rotation, and I use a thermometer. The milk texturization is never consistent though.
 
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