Keeping Retail Beans Fresh

HD883R

New member
Nov 10, 2004
10
0
We will be opening a coffee bar within the next month or so and a dilemma I have is how to keep beans fresh for retail sale. I go to places all the time that have their beans stored in acrylic or glass containers, which from my estimation cannot be the best way. I realize that most of the retail coffee purchased out there is stale and I do not want to contribute to this practice with my customers. Is there an inexpensive vacuum sealer that will do the trick? Any other suggestions that anyone may have out there would be greatly appreciated!!![/b]
 

ourcoffeebarn

New member
Nov 8, 2004
174
1
Wisconsin
Are you roasting your own beans?

If you would bag the beans in a coffee bag designed to keep beans fresh would be the best way. A one way gas valve is needed to allow the gas the fresh roasted beans give off to escape, while not allowing any air back in. To know if the beans are fresh roasted the bag should be kind of puffy like a pillow for about 2-3 weeks after a month or more the bag will look vacuum sealed because the beans are no longer giving off any gases, and the people trying to smell the coffee while squeezing the bag force all the gas out.

Most wholesale coffee roasters will have these bags available, I know that I do.
 
OP
H

HD883R

New member
Nov 10, 2004
10
0
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
Ourcoffeebarn,
Thanks for replying! We will not be roasting but will be receiving the beans freshly roasted. We want to packed some for retail by the lb. As far as the valved bags are concerned, how do we seal these bags. Is there a machine that is required to do this?
 

phaelon56

New member
Sep 25, 2003
74
0
Syracuse NY
You'll need a heat seal machine - they're available from most packaging or bag suppliers and are relatively inexpensive. If you'll be doing a limited volume of 1 lb bags just get a little hand held unit like we use. For five pound bags and larger volume it's easier to get the one with a wider sealing bar that is activated by a foot pedal.
 
OP
H

HD883R

New member
Nov 10, 2004
10
0
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #5
Thank you very much for the information, greatly appreciated!!!
 

upnorthcoffee

New member
Mar 30, 2005
38
0
Minneapolis, MN
Air is going to be the beans worst enemy and let them get stale, so say no to big bins! Go for a 12-16 oz. bag unless you have requests from a customer for a 5 lb. version.
 
OP
H

HD883R

New member
Nov 10, 2004
10
0
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #7
My thinking exactly, thanks for the advice!!!
 

GCS

New member
Jun 4, 2005
21
0
Do they make 2 lb. heat sealed bags that you mentioned earlier? I haven't been able to find them, and 1 lb. of coffee just isn't enough most of the time :D
 

MrJim

New member
Jun 14, 2005
7
0
Hayward, WI
I hate to sound old fashioned but I think you're missing the point. If you're not going to roast your own coffee, you need to find a good, small coffee roaster who is very close to you and will sell in any amount you order re: if you need 3 pounds, they'll sell you three pounds. Make the extra effort to keep on top of your ordering and don't be afraid to tell your customers you are "temporarily out....why don't you try this!" If you manage your inventory well, you will have no problem keeping your beans fresh in a 12 x 18 inch plastic bag ($0.03) with a twist tie. You will have enough to keep you busy with out heat sealing all your bags everytime you sell coffee. My experience has shown that somewhere between 99 and 100% of the valve bags leak anyway and are very expensive. Also, limit your selection and steer your customers to the beans you need to move (assuming they are all good). I personally like the false front on the counter that shows different beans but is not used for dispensing.
 

chenyaoxian

New member
Jul 30, 2005
9
0
China
you can buy the standup zipper pouch from me?

standup zip pouch:

zip canbe re-open-close,also have a valve in the middle of the bags.
MOQ:30,000pcs

Victor
 
Rather than vacuum, you might consider nitrogen flushing. It is on the expensive side (list anyway), but for ideas, take a look at the nitrovac.

http://www.sorbentsystems.com/nitrovac.html

If you are looking for a way to differentiate in your market, this could be one way to do it.

You still have the display issue with staling.

On the topic of freshness, I recommend a recent article by the Hartman Group, publishers of the LOHAS Journal. Worth a read.

http://www.hartman-group.com/products/H ... 07_28.html
 

mcohveca

New member
Aug 21, 2005
53
0
PA
Coffee Freshness

Please, whatever you do, don't put the coffee in open bins, or tin tie bags! Coffee has two main enemies: Air, and light.
As posted earlier, use a heat sealer for each bag of coffee. If your roaster is not willing to package your coffee for you, you may want to reconsider your choice in supplier.
We wholesale our coffee and package in the way our customer wants it. We also roast to order. It takes a little more time, but that is the best way for us, the customers we supply, and the end consumer.
Most coffee is stale when purchased in groceries, or big chain coffee shops. Preserving freshness can be your competitive advantage, use it for all it's worth!

Good luck.
Alex
www.cohvecacoffee.com
 

javaboy

New member
Jan 10, 2016
11
0
As phaelon56 stated: I've tried for longer than a 2 week storage using Food saver bags, vacuum packed in the freezer. we freeze in week size bags. Once in the freeze , it does not come out until ready to use, to keep any condensation from forming within the bag. How ell the bag is sealed and the relative humidity when sealing could be a factor. We only gone as far as a month in the freezer. you might try on some "routine beans" not your best ones.

 

nikkakae

New member
Jan 13, 2016
13
0
i usually just keep it in a air tight glass jar.. or you can use also ziplocks if you have few beans remaining
 

sjmyst

New member
Oct 26, 2015
30
0
Allen, Texas
While doing some research on this very topic for an article for my coffee bean website, I found the same thing as Alex above (mcohveca).

The primary enemy of coffee bean freshness is air and light.

I really liked the suggestions that Mr. Jim made above about directing customers to beans that need to move (having sales). And, I agree with several above that one way valves can help if you want to pay the extra $$, but that you shouldn't need the one way valve if you are moving your beans quickly enough.

During my research a common suggestion was to just store in air tight containers, and store them at room temperature in a dark pantry, hidden from the light.

As for freezing, many people suggest to not freeze. Or, if you need to freeze, to only freeze ONCE. That it's the change of temperature that causes the most damage to the coffee beans. The other thing to think about with freezing is that if you plan to freeze for an extended time (still not really recommended), that you should make sure there aren't other strong aroma's in your freezer that could have their smell seep into the coffee beans. I'm not expecting you to have fish in your coffee shop freezer, but something else to think about if you decide freezing is for you.

Regards,
sjmyst
 

Latest posts

Top