Looking for test users in SF area

OP
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Fresh Roaster

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Jun 30, 2006
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harpua said:
Good old fashioned roasting...Seen it, done it, know it, love it. Without a doubt works and everyone knows it.

Fresh Roaster-Your web site says what you have said in your posts-at least your consistent there. But there is no independent way to prove or disprove what you are saying. No independent testimonial or study. Nor did anyone ask. Your selling. I do not read here to be sold.

to quote the first response "Read the rules....no spam please."

Ok. Let's just keep the focus and discussion on technology then. :grin:
 

aeneas1

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Mar 22, 2005
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i know this beast....

i live in marin which is just north of san francisco - about 5-6 years ago i took a drive to see this this machine in action (don't remember how i had heard about it) and met the developers. spoke with one at length (great guy) and he took me through the full operation and explained how usage data was downloaded to the companies computer for billing.

the guys worked out of a small office in the industrial park section of rohnert park or santa rosa which is about 40 minutes north of sf - there was little else in the small office other than the lone demo machine. at the time they were still working out some wrinkles and orders for the machine weren't exactly piling up - as a matter of fact, i don't think they had sold one. i got the distinct feeling that the guys were running out time, capital or both...

what struck me most about the visit was the not the new technology or what this machine could or could not do - what struck me was the stark, unnerving reality of trying to get such an expensive product to market.

so are you one of the fellows that i met? or did you purchase the company from them? i noticed that your site doesn't include any testimonials ("under construction") - how many of these units do you have in the field and who are your clients?

fwiw, i found the machine interesting; especially the fact that you can hold quite a few different varietals in the bins which can be automatically mixed for roasting (if i remember correctly). however, imo, these machines are better suited to grocery store and quick-mart operations, not retail coffe shops that roast their own beans on the premises in view of their customers.

probats, dietrichs and other such classic machines are synonymous with small coffee roasteries, they're entrenched - further, their retro appearance and manual operation is what customers want to see; there is something very organic about these machines which compliments the rich history of coffee perfectly and this is not lost on patrons...
 

luvgoodcoffee

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Oct 9, 2006
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About Fresh Roast

I've read all of the posts and really think all of the pro roasters here should try the coffee from the Fresh Roast System. Being that it is sold mostly in California grocery stores it might be difficult to taste. But, there is a guy in Texas who uses this system and roasts some awesome coffee. I'm not trying to sell anybody on anything but the website is www.texasroast.com.

Once you taste coffee roasted from this system you will never go back to drinking Starbucks or other coffee since the coffee is so good. The owner of Texas Roast knows about the right kind of blends to use to make the coffee perform the way you want it to. The machine does the rest. Why not use a state of the art roaster to make it simpler for consumers to enjoy good coffee instead of being given expensive options?

The wine industry converted to this long ago where they had to find a more efficient way of producing high quality wines to meet industry demand. The result is more quality wine being sold to more people at moderate prices. I know this forum is here for the "coffee artists" but we can't ignore consumer demand once there is a better way of making a product on the market. :)
 

luvgoodcoffee

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Oct 9, 2006
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Texas Roast

I don't work for Texas Roast but I am a customer. I've been drinking coffee at artsy-fartsy coffee houses for 15 years and I have not come across as good a coffee as Texas Roast. I called the company to ask how they do it...he told me they use a special machine that allows him to roast without burning and it is very consistent. The consistency is why I keep buying his coffee online. I can't get it anywhere else. But, if I come across one of these machines from Fresh Roast, then I'd consider it.

The reference to wine was simply an analogy that can and will change the coffee industry. If you look at all of the large winery's, they all started small and took over a percentage of the market. There are some very, very good mid-sized wine makers out there creating a good product and selling it at reasonable prices. So, (drawing the parallel) why not do it with coffee?

I'd love to pay $8 or $9 a pound for excellent coffee instead of $13 or $14 a pound...wouldn't you?
 

topher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2003
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Boca Raton
I went to check out Texas Roast..the reason I asked if you worked for them was their site says nothing about their roasting process. You sure know a lot about it. I can tell you this..you might think their coffee is good..their site needs work. First off they are seeling coffee for $9.95. $9.95 for what? It does not specify quantitiy. The only place it speaks of weight is the international sampler. The sampler sells for $35.95. It consists of 6 half pounds...which works out to about 6 dollars a half pound. You said ," I'd love to pay $8 or $9 a pound for excellent coffee instead of $13 or $14 a pound...wouldn't you?" but in the sampler you are paying close to that...$12 a pound. :roll: They could also use some work on their packaging..you might be just a customer but I am having trouble believing that you do not work for them..or own it.
 

luvgoodcoffee

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Oct 9, 2006
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Wholesale Customer

I buy wholesale and resell it in my store. I spoke to the owner and he told me all about this machine. You should stop roasting coffee and be a detective...you're pretty good! See, if you had a machine like this you could let it handle the roasting and devote more time to the detective role. :)
 

topher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2003
3,736
13
Boca Raton
Re: Wholesale Customer

luvgoodcoffee said:
See, if you had a machine like this you could let it handle the roasting and devote more time to the detective role. :)
Im glad you think this is funny...as to the time I wasted to prove you were spamming..trust me I don't think its funny. As to my machines...umm...I am completely happy with them. I roast over 25,000 lbs a week and honestly do not think that this machine can keep up with our demand...and to be honest I personally perfer the taste of drum roasted coffee.
 
OP
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Fresh Roaster

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Jun 30, 2006
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Re: Wholesale Customer

topher said:
luvgoodcoffee said:
See, if you had a machine like this you could let it handle the roasting and devote more time to the detective role. :)
Im glad you think this is funny...as to the time I wasted to prove you were spamming..trust me I don't think its funny. As to my machines...umm...I am completely happy with them. I roast over 25,000 lbs a week and honestly do not think that this machine can keep up with our demand...and to be honest I personally perfer the taste of drum roasted coffee.

Topher, the machine in question was not designed for wholesalers or people roasting 25,000 pounds of coffee. Although I do know that using our laser would make you a better roaster. Sorry though, we don't sell them! :D It was designed for the retailer who wants fresh coffee everyday, doesn't want to hire a roastmaster and doesn't want to pay for a your insurance, employees, worker's comp and other overhead and profit. It eliminates a whole distribution channel and all of the costs associated with a third party. The machine was designed for the cafe owner, grocery store owner and maybe even a high traffic hotel, casino or restaurant who doesn't want to pay the low volume premium from the average wholsaler when he/she can get the freshest possible product, no waste and even a little in-store theatrics and attention.. all for half the price they pay now.
 
OP
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Fresh Roaster

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And BTW Topher, we are a drum roaster. We're just able to roast in your living room without anyone getting upset! :p And it's on wheels. After that you can unplug it and roll it on out if you'd like!
 

demetri

New member
Jul 18, 2006
175
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Winnipeg, MB
topher said:
Read the rules....no spam please. :roll:
so this machine will replace the"roast master" eh? So it can buy and cup coffee..pretty impressive :roll:

I have to agree, this is SPAM flavored. I'm not judging the merit of the roasting method, just the merit of the post. This should at least be in the B2B and there is a URL nicely dropped in the message.

I'm moving this to B2B.
 
OP
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Fresh Roaster

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demetri said:
What is one of these machines going to sell for? Please just provide the price and no rhetoric.

We don't sell them. We provide the equipment and maintenance at no cost and users pay between $1-2 roasting fee depending on volume. There are currently no minimums and no commitments. We only ask that the user supply an electrical outlet and proof of business casualty insurance.
 

demetri

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Jul 18, 2006
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Winnipeg, MB
So is that $1.00 to $2.00 per lbs of coffee beans? Any idea of what the power consumption would be for a typical operation?

Say I roast 1,000 lbs of coffee beans a week, how much am I paying in roasting fees and how much power is the machine going to use typically to roast 1,000 lbs of coffee?
 
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