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Storing coffee beans

Coffeenarr

New member
Jan 5, 2021
12
0
I don't remove my coffee from the container they came in. I find it the best way to presserve their taste. But I see some tips here are quite to my liking to try it.
 

Sescys

New member
Jan 26, 2021
5
0
However, I strongly believe keeping them in their own bag, wrapped very tightly works best. Whilst I like airtight containers, most of them tend to be fixed shape, which results in contact to air, unless they are the perfect size.





The best thing is to buy a supply of airtight, resealable bags, with one-way valves. And pack them with as little air as possible in, as the coffee continues 'breathing' it'll replace the oxygen with CO2, creating a protective layer.
 

cofcof

New member
Jan 12, 2021
5
0
Someone on these Coffee forums once posted, or linked to, a scholarly paper on scientific research into storing roasted coffee beans for the commercial environment. Their conclusion, if I remember correctly, was that a combination of vacuum packing and freezing, at below zero degrees Fahrenheit, was effective for some specific finite period of time.
 

BenA

New member
Feb 9, 2021
15
0
Germany
Well, it makes sense to buy a nice and shiny metal container if you are planning to store those beans for a longer time, but if you consume for a week or two the original resealable bag you got from your roastery will do the job. In the meanwhile I started to use second resealable bag. I buy 0.5kg, then split pour about a half into another bag. The beans from this bag will be consumed first, maximum within a week. When pulling espresso I started to notice need in grind size adjustments from even within those 2 weeks I keep the beans, so splitting them right after buying into two parts solves the problem for me, less exposure to the super aggressive environment we humans live in ;-D
 

MntnMan62

New member
Nov 15, 2019
443
3
New Jersey
I used to buy a pound of beans at a time and would remove them from the bag and store them in a stainless cannister that has a CO2 vent. Lately I've been buying two pounds at a time. One goes in the stainless cannister and the other is stuck in a zip lock freezer bag and put in the freezer. I go through a pound of cofffee in about 4 to 6 weeks. I find this approach works well for me and my beans remain fresh.
 

AstonishingCoffeeCo

New member
Feb 12, 2021
17
0
Houston
I get my coffee from Astonishing Coffee Co (yes, this is a company account I am using) and the bags that are used are made from a type of foil that block out the light and also have a degas valve. I keep the coffee bag in my cupboard when not being used and I haven't had any issues.
 

BenA

New member
Feb 9, 2021
15
0
Germany
Yeah, the original bag usually does a perfect job if you consume it within a week or two maximum. In our family 12oz bag would last about 10 days, but sometimes I can't withstand the desire to buy 1-2 extra bags of new beans and with repeating opening and closing I can notice changes, especially when pulling shots. So, you can either separate it into multiple bags, this would work for some time, or use a coffee canister, vacuum or those with a CO2 vent. Here is an article on storing coffee beans. I would not go with a mason jar, especially if you are planning to store beans for longer time, but like somebody mentioned before, the whole story depends on the beans you buy. If that's fresh roasted specialty coffee then storing it in a special coffee container would make more sense. If that's a bag of mainstream coffee, then it just has already less to lose and you may not notice the difference.
 

CoffeeHolicMike

New member
Jan 2, 2021
7
0
North Idaho
I get my coffee from Astonishing Coffee Co (yes, this is a company account I am using) and the bags that are used are made from a type of foil that block out the light and also have a degas valve. I keep the coffee bag in my cupboard when not being used and I haven't had any issues.

Ben, you may be correct about just using the original bag. I'm new here, but I am now (as of recently) using a Breville smart grinder pro and a KBT 741 Technivorm. I am currently just buying my coffee at a local "Thomas Hammer". Having said that, I usually, at least lately, simply use the original bag to keep the coffee in. At Thomas Hammer they do NOT have a CO2 release valve either. I simply squeeze the air out of it after each use, as tightly as I can, and strap a rubber band around it. This works OKAY, and we buy our coffee about 1 - 1 1/4 lbs at a time, which lasts us roughly a week. I am noticing that toward the end of the week the coffee seems to be getting a bit more bitter, no matter what I do. So I too have been in search of the perfect solution for storage. I tried (a couple of times) a "Prepara Evac" glass jar with air escape valve, but I am not sure it made a lot of difference. Most recently I also had a couple of Dark Brown glass jars with lids left over from a local coffee roaster who packeges their coffee in them. So, I tried immediately filling a jar out of the paper bag the coffee came home in, filling all the way to the top, shaking it down a bit to fill the jar to the max, eliminating as much air space as possible. FAIL!! After 3 or 4 days I started using the jarred coffee today, which had been stored for the last several days in the back of an appliance garage on my counter (in the dark or course). Probably half of this mornings beans came out of the top of the jar and all of us (4 adults) thought the coffee was for some reason a bit more "bitter" than usual, just not as good. So, so much for that idea. Back to just storing it in the paper bags I guess, as I haven't yet found a better solution. Oh... last thought.... The EVAK jars I mentioned above... As I said, not sure it made a lot of difference, and I went through 2 of them. The problem with them also is that when they are mostly empty they tip over REALLY easily. Once bump with your arm or elbow while you are making coffee and they hit the counter with a huge crash, and you get to stop making coffee and clean up glass and coffee beans. Good luck to you all.
Mike
 

BenA

New member
Feb 9, 2021
15
0
Germany
Hey @CoffeeHolicMike! When you say your coffee becomes bitter, then it could be related to uneven extraction or over-extraction. This may also be related to the degassing process of your fresh beans, first everything works fine with your "recipe", then in a few days bean characteristics change and you get those unexpected results. So, I doubt it is because of that container. As you know, most active degassing take place in the 14 first days, I think this is the time where you should adjust your recipe, amount of beans per brew, grind size or amount of water. So, try to use less water after 3-4 days or have a more coarse grind, check your process, make sure you have even distribution of grounds in the filter.

I don't have experience with KBT 741, but I would experiment, especially if you use the same beans / roast again and again, try to play. When I pull espresso I have to readjust grind size each 3-4 days with the beans I buy.

Regarding Evac. I think it's a good container, but I know that glass is tricky, I broke a glass carafe last year too. So, I think you problem is not related to your container. I also think it makes sense to use a container for long-term storage, splitting the beans you just bought. Otherwise with opening and closing several times per day you expose it to air anyway, this can affect those fresh beans.
 
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CoffeeHolicMike

New member
Jan 2, 2021
7
0
North Idaho
Thanks Ben, you're a genius!!!! The grinder I mentioned above is a "digital" grinder with 60 grind settings, so this morning I switched from the "39" setting the "41" setting, just a little coarser, and increased the grind time from 24.8 seconds to 25.4 seconds of grind (for just a little stronger), and what a difference. Great cup of coffee!!! I'm still learning on both the grinder and the new Technivorm pot, both are fairly new to me, but your input was incredibiy helpful. Interestingly, on the 2nd pot today I tried going to a "42" grind, but it got just a hint of sour, so 41 it is, at least for today. :coffee:

Technivorm, I believe, says that this pot is an "electric pour-over pot", and I have learned to "stir the bloom" (stir the grounds) as it begins, for more even extraction. In fact I usually do this 2 or 3 times during the brew, so even extraction is not a problem... I think! :shock: The only drawback to this coffee pot so far, at least the way I am doing it (stirring the grounds as it brews) is that I have to monitor it as it brews (with the grind I am using anyway) and shut it off a couple of times while I wait for the water to seep throught the grounds and the filter. Technivorm says to use a coarser grind with this pot, I assume for this reason, but this would seem to be counter-productive to achieving the cup of coffee I did this morning. In any case, If I have to do this to achieve the coffee I had today, screw it (am I allowed to say that?), I'll put up with it. :D Over-extraction, I don't know how to tell, but again, this mornings coffee was really great. It's really interesting to me that coffee changes this much over a few days, even when you attempt air tight storage.

On the EVAC... Perhaps I was overly critical, I didn't mean to be, it's a good product! The one I had was basically a glass tube, maybe 8 or 10 inches tall, and when it is nearly empty DON'T bump it, it will be top heavy and go over with a crash! I lost two this way and gave up on my ability to use them... but that's on me.

As far as bean freshness, supposedly they are very fresh. Thomas hammer fills their containers once a week, on Friday at the store down the street, and I have never been sure how fresh they actually are, but this rapid change in the beans would seem to indicate that they are indeed pretty darned fresh, as they are obviously changing fairly rapidly no matter how carefully I store them.

In any case, and again, thanks, I'm learning! Hey, any suggestions on reading I could do to enhance my knowledge (and continue my life quest for perfect coffee)?

Mike
 
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BenA

New member
Feb 9, 2021
15
0
Germany
Hey CoffeeHolicMike I am really happy I could help! :-D Yeah, just experiment! There is a lot of info online, but at the end, I think at some point you begin to "feel" the process. For example, I have Breville Express, it's a good machine, but of course it doesn't have some functions that a professional one would have, so it took me several months to understand what's going on, what and how to adjust. So, again, happy that you managed to brew great coffee! :)

P.S. you mentioned
Thomas hammer fills their containers once a week
. What is that, like some self-service thing on the street?
 

Mr.Peaberry

Member
Aug 7, 2013
889
2
Hey CoffeeHolicMike I am really happy I could help! :-D Yeah, just experiment! There is a lot of info online, but at the end, I think at some point you begin to "feel" the process. For example, I have Breville Express, it's a good machine, but of course it doesn't have some functions that a professional one would have, so it took me several months to understand what's going on, what and how to adjust. So, again, happy that you managed to brew great coffee! :)

P.S. you mentioned . What is that, like some self-service thing on the street?

If I could make a couple of suggestions...I would just suggest asking two things of Thomas Hammer: Do they remove the "expired" beans and clean the container before refilling on Fridays, and is there any way of knowing the roast date for the batch currently being sold.
 
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