Vev Vigano stovetop espresso maker help

Diabolik

New member
Jul 30, 2008
1
0
New York
I''m hoping I might be able to get some help/advice here. About 8 years ago, I received a Vev Vigano espresso maker as a gift. It''s unlike any other one I''ve seen and I unfortunately can''t find any corresponding images online. Don''t know what model it is as the only inscription, at the base, is \"VEV INOX ACC INOX 18/10\" which I gather is for the stainless steel material.

Anyway, it''s cylindrical, sleek, vertical...kind of like a motorcycle cylinder, with a black plastic ribbing around the neck to use as a handle.

Some couple of years ago the gasket started to rot and the filter plate seemed to be flaking in some weird way. The plate seemed to be made of aluminum rather than the stainless steel of the \"pot\" itself.

I replaced the gasket and filter with some generic ones I found in a supermarket and they lasted for less than a year. The rubber gasket always seems to crumble and rot, and the plate kind of flakes a in a strange way.

Has anyone had a problem like this with a stovetop pot? Relatives who have them seem to have used the same gaskets/plates for ages without ever having to replace them. I love this Vev that I have but can''t figure out if perhaps I''m just doing something wrong. The replacement gaskets/plates all fit but were perhaps a slight bit snug. Would that be an issue? Does anyone know if Vev Vigano has a website? I can''t seem to find one. Any recommendations for specific gasket/plate replacements for Vev Viganos?

Thanks for any help you might be able to provide.
 

coffeepotato

New member
Mar 15, 2008
30
0
You may be able to get some Vev gaskets in here (not sure if the seller is any good, never dealt with them):
http://www.laruso.ca/vev-vigano-gasket-sets-c-66_181_195.html?sort=3a&page=1

"Flaking in some weird way" sounds like corroded aluminum. Do you store your espresso maker disassembled? The corrosion is caused by water trapped in the filter and it is most likely to occur if you store the filter inside the pot. If you always store the filter on its own then the water can evaporate and the filter is less likely to get corroded. You may want to have a look at my page about aluminum stove top espresso maker - you will find some more tips about avoiding the corrosion.
 

petterz88

New member
Apr 13, 2009
3
0
Re:

coffeepotato said:
You may be able to get some Vev gaskets in here (not sure if the seller is any good, never dealt with them):
http://www.laruso.ca/vev-vigano-gasket-sets-c-66_181_195.html?sort=3a&page=1

"Flaking in some weird way" sounds like corroded aluminum. Do you store your espresso maker disassembled? The corrosion is caused by water trapped in the filter and it is most likely to occur if you store the filter inside the pot. If you always store the filter on its own then the water can evaporate and the filter is less likely to get corroded. You may want to have a look at my page about aluminum stove top espresso maker - you will find some more tips about avoiding the corrosion.

oh yes now i know, thankful you have this one
 

mugwort

New member
May 24, 2009
1
0
Diabolik,
Please read this (How To Use Stovetop Espresso Makers), as using too high heat will quickly destroy the gasket.
This information is from the VeV-Vigano website.
When ordering a new gasket, download the Vev-Vigano Gasket Template .pdf file first to determine which gasket/pot you have.

http://vev-vigano.com/ (Vev-Vigano Website)
http://store.casasolo.com/espresso-makers.html (Espresso Makers)
http://store.casasolo.com/espresso-maker-parts.html (Parts)
http://vevusa.com/media/gaskets.pdf (Vev-Vigano Gasket Template)

How To Use Stovetop Espresso Makers:
The "cup" size of espresso makers is based on Italian espresso cups (tazza) and equates to approximately 1.5 ounces per "cup". Stovetop espresso makers, also known as espresso pots, moka pots, or caffettiere are very simple to own, operate, and care for.
1. The lower tank is filled with water to a level just below the brass pressure valve. This is not a very critical amount that needs to be measured. Some water will always be left in the lower tank to prevent scorching. Do not fill past the pressure valve or the pot will not work.

2. Insert the funnel filter in the lower tank and fill with espresso coffee. It is not necessary to tamp or compress the coffee, allow the coffee to form a mound in the centre of the funnel and it will properly compress when you screw the two tanks together.

3. Screw the upper tank and lower tank together tightly and place on the stovetop.

4. Use a medium-to-low flame appropriate to the tank diameter. Using too wide of a flame will burn the sides of the pot, and can damage the internal gasket and handle.

5. Leave the lid of the pot open and you should see coffee begin to seep into the upper tank within a few minutes. When the upper tank is almost filled, close the lid and remove the pot from the heat source.

6. Allow the coffee to finish brewing off the heat until no more coffee rises into the upper tank ... usually about 20 seconds or so.

Serve immediately in warm demitasse cups or in cappuccino cups topped with warmed or steamed milk. Italian coffee is often served liberally sweetened, to the extent that you are almost preparing a coffee liquor.

It is advisable to make and discard 3 pots of coffee with any new espresso maker to season the pot prior to use.

What Coffee to Use:
Moka pots work best with "moka grind" ... a coarse grind espresso. All of the major Italian coffee brands sell a moka grind. If you are grinding yourself or buying ground coffee from a roaster, Moka is just a bit coarser than the coffee for an electric espresso machine. Using too fine a coffee can cause the moka pot to clog.

How To Make American Coffee With Espresso Makers:
An Americano, a mug of American Joe is easy to make with a stovetop espresso maker. To make a single large mug of American coffee you will need a 3-4 cup espresso maker. Fill your mug approximately 1/3 with milk, add in a full pot (3-4 oz.) from your espresso maker and top up the mug with boiling water from a kettle. Adjust to your liking. Remember the coffee produced by an espresso maker will be much more concentrated than from a drip coffee machine so the significant diluting with milk and water will bring the espresso closer to a drip of French press coffee strength.

How To Clean Espresso Makers:
Aluminum espresso makers must not be placed in the dishwasher, while stainless steel pots are dishwasher safe. The best way to clean all of the espresso makers is with a quick rinse and air dry after the pot has cooled down. Go easy on the soap and scouring. Espresso makers will darken and "season" inside with use this is considered desirable and improves the quality of the coffee over time. If the pot develops any chalky mineral deposits they can be removed with a mixture of water and plain vinegar.
 

GetchHard

New member
Jun 1, 2009
1
0
I gather too much information in this discussion so I am thanking you all for this wonderful topic and discussion.,
 

billye

New member
Jul 27, 2016
2
0
Another Vev Vigano problem: coffee grounds in my espresso

Suddenly my stovetop Vigano pot is giving me no coffee but lots of sludge & grounds in my cup. I have cleaned the tubes & of course the filters, am proceeding as usual but not getting drinkable coffee. What can I be doing wrong?
 

KiethBazylewicz

New member
Aug 8, 2016
9
0
I gather too much information in this discussion so I am thanking you all for this wonderful topic and discussion.,
 

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