where do i start?

new2bizness

New member
Mar 3, 2010
1
0
I'm sure most of you have heard this question a million timesbefore, however, Where do i start. Im going to be a new buisiness owner. I'm currently employed with corporate american and have been for 12 years and I'm ready for something new. I cant take the office setting anymore. I want to work with people.
The coffee shop idea came to me not only because I drink coffee but becuase I moved to a new area that is up and coming and has serveral fairly new townhome and single family homes and there is NO COFFEE SHOP existing anywhere. I noticed at my nearbly large grocery store chain, it used to be a coffee shop that is now closed with a for rent sign above. I contacted the owner of the bldg and inquired about the previous coffee shop and he said they closed after 4 years of business because starbucks opened across the street. Well now there is NO Starbucks and no nearby existing places to get coffee. I say all this to ask. With an existing building that was previously housed a coffee shop Where do I began. I know this will be a great venture because of the area and location. I have the start up money and need no bank loans however I know absolutely nothing about running or starting a business, let alone a coffee shop. Where DO I START? i.e. equipment, what do i get., how do i know what kind of coffee beans do i want. simple things like this., Is there some sort of resource that can point me in the right direction. PLEASE HELP.
 

John P

New member
Jan 5, 2007
1,045
0
Salt Lake City
The Small Business resource/development center in your area,

and the following.

SCAA Exposition - http://www.scaaexposition.org/ in Mid April.

Coffeefest - http://www.coffeefest.com/ in NYC (ish) tomorrow, or Minneapolis in June, Seattle October.

Truly understand the business and coffee and espresso in every aspect before you even think about opening.

Answer all of your questions for yourself by spending the time and research to do it. If you fail to learn, understand, and ultimately master these things without self motivation and self reliance, you will not survive the business world.
 

John P

New member
Jan 5, 2007
1,045
0
Salt Lake City
While lack of capital is one top three reasons why businesses fail, I would put it at number two. First being lack of preparation (understanding of the dynamics of everything you are about to do), and lastly being proper location (size, shape, demographic, physical location).

One of the things you should do is to understand where to best allocate funds. First and foremost is proper training and understanding of the product you are serving and buying that product (coffee) based on quality and not based on price. Sadly, many owners get roped into buying substandard products for $6.00 or $7.00 per pound or so and all they really have is generic coffee with some unknown name attached to it. Whether it's coffee or a restaurant, always buy the very best ingredients you can source and charge accordingly. You can't get prime rib at hamburger prices.

Travel. Experience. Understand.

We took the better part of two years traveling to different shops in and out of country as well as attending two or three conventions and taking part in classes. We tested about 120-130 different espresso roasters before we opened (we've roasted our own for about 3 1/2 years+ now), and blind cupped once we got down to the final ten. We tested the final three as espresso, cappuccino, and Americano time after time after time to understand which would most consistently produce the best flavors and go from there. We purchased prosumer level espresso machine and a commercial grinder to test everything and hone our barista skills. It's not something you can do overnight, it takes single minded determination and the ability to separate the reality from the b.s.

My final thought on where to start is to ask yourself the question, "What will it take to be the best (barista/coffeeshop owner, etc.) today?" and then do it.
 
C

coffeeloverlisa

Guest
I started my online business just under 2 years ago. I was not specifically looking for a coffee business, but a business model that used as many skills I had as possible. I do not drive so online had to the way for me... as well I am quite computer design literate.

So before rushing into the coffee business, I would first decide if you are ready to function at business, period. Honestly take inventory of your skills you bring to the table: design, accounting, staff management, cleaning, food prep, fixing stuff, inventory control, right down to the last detail. Anything that would have to be done. THEN look at coffee, learning about product, tasting, roasting, packaging, turnover, sampling, reviews of product, selection of product.

It really does not matter what you are selling quite frankly. If you are a good salesman with solid business practices, you will be fine.

Cheers.
 
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