Advice and Recommendations Please: Buying Espresso Machine for Aspiring Cafe Owner

SpicyRiceTea

New member
Jan 30, 2020
14
0
This kind of post is a dime a dozen, so sorry for that, but nothing really answered my particular question.

My goal is to someday open my own coffee shop, and as a result, I want a semi-automatic machine that can pull good shots, froth well and that allows me to deepen my understanding of coffee (managing pressure, temperature, latte art, etc...).

The Gaggia Classic is one that comes up often, and I'll probably end up taking it if I can't find any other alternative.

That being said, when working in a professional setting, how important are PID or pressure gauges? If my goal is to own my coffee shop someday, should I pay up a bit more for these features?
In my case, output speed is not an issue, so I'm guessing a single boiler should be enough. Are there some other considerations that I need to take into account?
If so, what machines do you recommend?

I don't want to pay above 1k for my machine unless it's really necessary in order to achieve my goal.

Thank you in advance for your time,
Cheers!
 

MntnMan62

New member
Nov 15, 2019
445
1
New Jersey
You won't be making the kind of espresso people will pay good money for on a Gaggia Classic. It's an entry level machine that is fairly difficult to pull consistent shots with. Those machines you see in coffee shops cost a fair amount more than a $500 Gaggia Classic. More like well into the thousands, if not tens of thousands. And since you are calling it a "coffee shop", you will find a large number of people wanting drinks with espresso in them. Which means you'll want a machine with multiple groups. Probably a two group machine at a minumum, maybe even three. Otherwise, your customers will be waiting a long time for their coffee. If all you are trying to accomplish with this machine is to learn how to make a good espresso, then maybe you want to start with a manual lever machine like a Cafelat Robot that will allow you to really learn the ins and outs of making espresso. Learn the importance of water temps before and during the pull, timing of the shots, etc. The concept of coffee to water ratios. I'm sure others will be able to offer you better and more specific advice than I can provide.
 
May 28, 2020
57
1
Sarasota, FL USA
You won't be making the kind of espresso people will pay good money for on a Gaggia Classic. It's an entry level machine that is fairly difficult to pull consistent shots with. Those machines you see in coffee shops cost a fair amount more than a $500 Gaggia Classic. More like well into the thousands, if not tens of thousands. And since you are calling it a "coffee shop", you will find a large number of people wanting drinks with espresso in them. Which means you'll want a machine with multiple groups. Probably a two group machine at a minumum, maybe even three. Otherwise, your customers will be waiting a long time for their coffee. If all you are trying to accomplish with this machine is to learn how to make a good espresso, then maybe you want to start with a manual lever machine like a Cafelat Robot that will allow you to really learn the ins and outs of making espresso. Learn the importance of water temps before and during the pull, timing of the shots, etc. The concept of coffee to water ratios. I'm sure others will be able to offer you better and more specific advice than I can provide.


couldn't have said it better, I'd say start with something for your home and keep learning, saving, and developing a business plan.
Once you are ready to move forward pursuing your dream you will be more equipped on how to pick and where to source your multiple group machine
 
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