Green Bean storage

FXAdam

New member
Jun 16, 2006
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Do I need to take any special steps to store green beans? My understanding is that green beans are better because they don't lose flavor via evaporation of their oils etc while being stored. Can I just leave them in a ziploc or should I take some other steps?

Thanks.
 

BoldJava

New member
Jul 29, 2006
69
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St Paul, Minnesota
FXAdam said:
Do I need to take any special steps to store green beans? ...Can I just leave them in a ziploc or should I take some other steps?

Thanks.

I store them in cotton bags, available from tons of sources. That bean is still 12-20% water and to me, it just seems logical to let it breathe during storage. As such, I shy away from ziplocks for green storage.

B|Java
 

cawi

New member
Apr 7, 2005
24
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Wisconsin
Store them in something that breathes, cotton bag, burlap sack, paper bag... They are shipped in burlap sacks but I think brown paper bags work just as well. Also keep them out of direct sunlight as this will cause the beans to fade and it makes them dull and boring!
 

virginhill

New member
Dec 5, 2007
18
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Knowlton, Quebec, Canada
Green beans are much easier to store than roasted beans.

Store them in a breathable bag ( paper, burlap, cotton, etc...), not in sunlight and also in room tempurture. You may wonder why in a breathable bag? Well the beans still have moisture and need to be able to release the moisture, that allows the bean to stay fresh and not go bad. The direct sun light will dry the beans and there should be at least 10% moisture in your bean.
 

bullard

New member
Mar 26, 2011
4
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I store mine in cotton bags also. In the closet where it is dark and the temp stays about the same.:coffee1:
 

alphawave7

New member
Mar 23, 2011
137
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Plastic zipper bags for me..greens don't last long enough 'round here to worry too much about'em going bad. :)
 

Coffee Guy

New member
Oct 19, 2003
874
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Seattle,Washington USA
What is considered room temperture? To be on the safe side keep them stored in a cool temp and as most said here in a burlap bag. If you know of a local coffee roaster ask them for a bag or two. I give them away for free to lots of people in our community that use them for their flower beds, etc. I generally cut them up and use them for packing materials when shipping out our internet orders.
 

alsterling

New member
Aug 11, 2006
66
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Dana Point, CA
Do I need to take any special steps to store green beans? My understanding is that green beans are better because they don't lose flavor via evaporation of their oils etc while being stored. Can I just leave them in a ziploc or should I take some other steps? Thanks.

So.... what a great opportunity to chat about bean storage.....

This question comes up often, and usually centers on roasted and ground bean storage, and in a smaller population for green. (there are, logically and by count, more finished-product consumers of coffee than home and commercial roasters.)

I can think of numerous things I've stored over the years that carry the packaging instructions that include, "...cool and dry place, temperature range betwen 68 F to 72 F." Having been in photography most of my life, that was the mandate for film. Today, in the digital world, I worry less about temp and humidity, but more neurotically, how I might accidently break those tiny, micro cards in two! (...it's that pocket storage thing, yet that's where they go most of the time!? Why don't I put them back in the protective plastic case?)

For home coffee enthusiasts, we usually rotate both our green and roasted inventory well within the limits of the beans. However, commercial storage of green can extend to one year, or longer. Even as a home roaster or roasted bean consumer, and whether you store in "breathable" containment, airtight, or oxygen-evacuated bags, the "cool dry location issue" is still of uppermost importance. And if you're to maintain control over the many variables in brewing your coffee, whether it's drip/pourover or espresso methods, being better educated in all phases of coffee certainly helps to reduce all of the variables in achieving that "G*d Shot", to which many 'spro brewers refer.

So, if this is a realtively new area to you, and to work toward your "Associates Degree in Coffee".....I'd highly recommend reading the following page from Sweet Maria's website: Storing Green Coffee

While the information seems more aimed at commercial transit and storage of green, SM does address home storage with, what I suggest, is that same basic instruction I got from Kodak, while I was storing my Kodachrome and Polaroid shipments in that cooler near the Laotian border back in 1968; "Cool and dry." Which by the way, was the same basic instruction we received for maintaining "our-own-selves" back then, when someone was about to freak out in what was usually a stressful situation.
 

Fred44

New member
Jul 1, 2011
11
0
I read a study in Roast magazine a few years ago. They determined it was best to store them at 60%-75% relative humidity. Any less and it dries the beans, any more and they start to grow mold. This range was optimum to keep the bean moisture content at 11-13%. Also, greens should not be stored in Tupperware, they need to breath, burlap and cotton bags are your friends.

Source: Roast Magazine May/June 2008
 
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